Don Brunell

When a higher wage isn’t | Don Brunell

The news is full of organized protests and street demonstrations demanding a $15 minimum wage. Several cities across the nation have passed or are considering big hikes in their minimum wage.

Presidential travel, China style | Don Brunell

When China’s President Xi Jinping flew into Seattle last September, his presidential airliner looked like any other Air China 747-400 passenger jet. That is because it was.

No requiem for northwest aluminum | Don Brunell

Alcoa’s announcement that it is shutting down our state’s last two aluminum smelters may be a long awaited requiem for some, but there are other factors we should consider before burying it.

Apply Navy’s nuclear technology to civilian use | Don Brunell

Today, many elected officials are fixated on tearing down coal-fired power plants and replacing them with solar and wind farms. But that isn’t practical, because when there is no wind or sunlight those plants produce no electricity.

Politics aside, Koch’s way is good for America | Don Brunell

To listen to liberal politicians such as President Obama and Hillary Clinton, political donations by conservative billionaires Charles and David Koch epitomize what’s wrong with America’s political system. But Obama and Clinton are silent when liberal billionaires George Soros and Tom Steyer do the same.

EPA overreach not what scoop intended | Don Brunell

More than 40 years ago, Washington’s Sen. Henry M. “Scoop” Jackson authored the National Environmental Policy Act, which led to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Washington water bottle a hit in Yellowstone | Don Brunell

Later this month, most facilities in Yellowstone National Park will close for the winter. The year’s visitor total is likely to top last year’s 3.5 million people. It may even beat the all-time total of 3.64 million set in 2010.

Washington Business Week at 40 | Don Brunell

In the early 1970s, a small group of Washington business leaders led by Yelm grocer, Hal Wolf, decided it was time to integrate business owners with high school students.

Silver mining has a silver lining | Don Brunell

Remember the old saying, “Out of sight out of mind?” How about, “What you don’t know won’t hurt you?” Both of these axioms are problematic today, especially when it comes to things we need for our everyday lives. Here’s why.

Tesla and the mining business | Don Brunell

Tesla is the premium entry in the electric car market, with a starting price of $75,000. According to the Wall Street Journal, the high-end “Signature” model costs $132,000, slightly more than the base price for Porsche’s AG’s 911 GT3.

State Supreme Court Ruling Derails School Choice in Washington | Don Brunell

On Sept. 4, the State Supreme Court derailed Washington’s nascent charter school movement when it ruled that charter school Initiative 1240 is unconstitutional.

Arctic exploration is not new, just different – and safer | Don Brunell

Recently, activists paddled a flotilla of kayaks – made from petroleum products – into the Seattle harbor in an at tempt to blockade a Shell Oil offshore drilling platform destined for the Arctic. Then activists in Portland suspended themselves from the St. Johns Bridge – using all sorts of equipment and supplies made from petroleum products – in an effort to stop Shell’s ice breaker from leaving a local shipyard.

Inmate college scholarships shine light on mounting student debt | Don Brunell

The Obama Administration announced it will begin providing Pell grants to federal prisoners, effectively overturning a 1994 ban on the practice. While overturning the ban requires Congressional action, the administration is circumventing Congress by designating the plan a “pilot program.”

Chinese wine may appear on store shelves | Don C. Brunell

There was a time when wine connoisseurs looked with distain on wines produced in the United States.

WSU President Elson Floyd a hard act to follow | Don Brunell

Elson Floyd leaves big shoes to fill at Washington State University.

Careful about imposing a state income tax | Don Brunell

Connecticut is in a deep financial pickle and is in danger of seeing a mass exodus of businesses looking for states where taxes are lower and private sector employers are welcome.

Careful about imposing a state income tax | Don Brunell

Connecticut is in a deep financial pickle and is in danger of seeing a mass exodus of businesses looking for states where taxes are lower and private sector employers are welcome.

Kansas and North Carolina cutting taxes to spur jobs and growth | Don Brunell

In Olympia these days, lawmakers are high centered in a second special session over the budget to operate the state for the next two years. The stalemate has come down to the choice of raising taxes or funding government within the current revenues.

Reusing water can help farmers and fish | Don Brunell

Over the last few years, one of the remarkable successes is the record salmon returns to the Columbia River and its tributaries. Conversely, one of the biggest disappointments is low recovery of delta smelt in San Francisco Bay.

Reusing water can help farmers and fish | Don Brunell

Over the last few years, one of the remarkable successes is the record salmon returns to the Columbia River and its tributaries. Conversely, one of the biggest disappointments is low recovery of delta smelt in San Francisco Bay.