Wally DuChateau

Cumberland hot spot still packs ‘em in | Wally’s World

I’m not sure when Fred Nolte, of Deep Lake fame, originally built the Cumberland saloon. Suffice to say, he opened it as a hotel sometime before 190

Final goodbye to an old friend | Wally’s World

A few weeks ago, Art Pohlot died. He was a good friend – and that, of course, is one of the highest compliments I can pay him or anyone else.

Polo new but may catch on in Enumclaw | Wally’s World

My property borders the old Wohlman horse stable, located on 400th Street Southeast, a block or two from the Krain restaurant.

Life halts with computer crash | Wally’s World

The high-tech world that’s inundated all of us since the turn of the century has divided the whole of civilization into two parts: the Pre-Digital Age and the Post-Digital Age.

Messing with any drug is risky | Wally’s World

So, before concluding my befuddled discussion about addiction and states of consciousness, I want to pay some attention to the actual drugs.

Some are too easily addicted | Wally’s World

Last week we explored our innate desire to experience new states of consciousness; that is, when we’re dissatisfied with our present state of mind, we change it by ingesting various drugs. So, we drink coffee because we want to be more alert.

DNA holds a desire for new state of consciousness | Wally’s World

During the next few days, legal pot stores will start popping up all over King and Pierce counties. However, our cautious, duly-elected, local officials have, diplomatically and politically, decided to slap a moratorium on legal pot within the Enumclaw city limits.

Old Boomers shape society | Wally’s World

Though it may be difficult for us Baby Boomers to imagine, we’re getting old. Whoever thought such a thing would happen? This is the generation of hell-raisers who didn’t trust anyone over 30 – and suddenly we’re turning 65. In droves. Like, 10,000 of us cross that threshold every day.

Views shaped by the 1960s | Wally’s World

People sometimes ask me about my tastes in music, literature, movies, etc. Generally speaking, I’ll freely discuss such subjects without hesitation or reservations. In fact, I’ve openly pursued these matters in several columns.

Days gone by: reaching friends on the party line | Wally’s World

When I was a little kid, the Pacific Telephone Company owned the phone service within the greater Enumclaw region.

Papers remain top news source | Wally’s World

In case you haven’t heard, let this jolly columnist keep you informed: American newspapers are in big trouble. Many have disappeared during the past 40 years, including several large, really first-class operations like the Seattle Post Intelligencer. Home deliveries and the number of advertisers are all down and, consequently, so are the profits.

Carbonado historic saloon is worth the trip | Wally’s World

For the benefit of those who have just arrived in our mossy corner of the planet, you take a left on the other side of downtown Buckley, then an immediate right onto state Route 165 and continue for another five or six miles; drive through Burnett and Wilkeson and eventually you’ll end up in Carbonado, population 650, give or take a few.

Folk and jazz on display at café | Wally’s World

The other day I sat in the middle of my living room floor and started sorting through some 33 rpm records that have survived the last 40 or 50 years in fair, if not surprisingly, good condition.

‘Mama’ keeps volunteers happy | Wally’s World

Ginger “Mama” Passarelli is a warm, effervescent and happy, middle-aged ex-hippie who decided, if she was ever going to have children and a home, she’d have to forsake her life in a teepee on a communal, organic farm and get a job or start a business. So, 10 years ago she opened Mama Passarelli’s Italian restaurant in Black Diamond.

There’s still plenty to listen to | Wally’s World

Last week I claimed that the “digital revolution” is destroying popular music as we’ve known it in the past. This week I want to conclude this theme.

Vandals too much for public art | Wally’s World

You’ll probably recall that sculpture at the corner of Porter Street and Griffin Avenue in front of City Hall. “Boys In the Band” I think it was called.

Enumclaw Rainier favorite is on the road to recovery | Wally’s World

Karen Burnett has quite a story to tell. You may not recognize her name, but you’ve probably seen her one time or another, especially if you’ve spent any time in the Rainier Bar and Grill

U.S. economy seriously flawed | Wally’s World

Let’s face it: something is seriously wrong with the U.S. economy. I’m speaking not of the remnants of the recession, but of the structure of our society; that is, the middle class is rapidly shrinking, the lower class is growing and the gap between the wealthy and everyone else continues to increase at an alarming rate.

New entry in Enumclaw on the brew market | Wally’s World

Fifteen or 20 years ago, little hometown microbreweries began spring up all over the U.S. In our region, the first ones I remember were in Seattle and shortly thereafter they were popping up all over King and Pierce counties.

Art has a place – and price tag | Wally’s World

My friends, I have disturbing news to report. Studio 54 – one of the finest art galleries this muddle-headed writer has ever encountered during his trips through America’s foremost art salons – has closed its doors, unable to turn a profit in our little suburban environs. This is not just disturbing news, it’s actually rather depressing.