A leftist leader with the right idea | Don Brunell

Can you imagine a nation’s president, a former guerilla fighter with socialist leanings, enacting policies that favor business and encourage foreign investment? How about a leaderwho prefers living in a farmhouse rather than the presidential mansion? That person is José Mujica, the 79-year old president of Uruguay who finishes his five-year term in March. Uruguay, a small South American country sandwiched between Argentina and Brazil, does not allow a president to stand for reelection, so later this spring, Mujica will take a seat in the senate.

Can you imagine a nation’s president, a former guerilla fighter with socialist leanings, enacting policies that favor business and encourage foreign investment? How about a leader who prefers living in a farmhouse rather than the presidential mansion?

That person is José Mujica, the 79-year old president of Uruguay who finishes his five-year term in March.  Uruguay, a small South American country sandwiched between Argentina and Brazil, does not allow a president to stand for reelection, so later this spring, Mujica will take a seat in the senate.

In the 60s and 70s, Mujica was a guerrilla leader, imprisoned and tortured by Uruguay’s repressive government.  Freed in 1985, Mujica shed his violent past, opting instead to become the voice of pragmatism – the art of the possible.

Still, his Socialist leanings are apparent.  As president, he lives in a farmhouse with wood heat, saying it frees him from the shackles of consumerism.

But doesn’t consumerism drive a market-based economy and create tax revenues and jobs?  His answer to Fortune Magazine: “Life does not deserve to be turned into a slave for the pure and exclusive accumulation of junk . . . But I’m not stupid. I know this is not an economic recipe I can apply to the people.”

Uruguay has 3.4 million people, about half the population of Washington State. Its gross domestic product (GDP), a universal measure of a country’s economic success, has grown an average of 5.6 percent per year and on Mujica’s watch, the proportion of people living in poverty dropped from 40 percent to around 12 percent.

While many South American countries shun outside investment, local and foreign money has risen to 22 percent of GDP under Mujica.  The U.N. reports that in 2014, direct foreign investment slumped by 23 percent in Latin America and the Caribbean while soaring 9 percent in Uruguay.

The World Bank ranks Uruguay ninth out of 32 countries in the region for “ease of doing business.”  That is far higher than neighboring Brazil and Argentina, where nationalist policies have foiled foreign investors and local producers alike, and socialist Venezuela.

Uruguay’s flagship foreign investment is its new $2.5 billion pulp complex at Punta Pereira, on the nation’s southern coast. Pulp is a major ingredient in the manufacturing of paper.  The facility is now the largest pulp mill in the world, turning Uruguay’s plantations of eucalyptus trees into 1.3 billion tons of pulp a year.

The plant, which meets stringent European air and water quality standards, creates 5,000 direct and indirect jobs, with an annual payroll of over $100 million. It is also expected to contribute $844 million to Uruguay’s GDP. The industry’s importance to Uruguay is equivalent to that of Boeing in Washington.

Fortune reported that Uruguay’s beef industry is thriving as the government funds a comprehensive system for electronically tracking cattle, which has helped it access demanding foreign markets. Conversely, Argentina’s cattle industry has been devastated by periodic export bans and domestic price controls.  Uruguay has also developed one of Latin America’s leading software industries by easing the path for foreign startups, many of which have fled Argentina.

Mujica has his critics.  The Socialist Party says he hasn’t done enough, while the nation’s chamber of commerce is complementary, but takes issue with the influence of labor unions and the continued prominence of state-run companies.

While Uruguay’s economic output pales in comparison to ours, Mujica’s governing style is important to note.

Mujica is a pragmatic problem-solver, a humble leader who focuses on serving the people who elected him.  And, most interestingly, he is not caught up in the trappings of presidential power.

How refreshing!

 

More in Business

Keep the holiday spirit all year long | Don Brunell

During the holidays, our thoughts naturally turn to giving — not just giving gifts, but donating our time and money to charities, disasters and community programs.

Remember 1993

Twenty-five years ago, business took a beating in Olympia. The swing to the left in the 1992 general election was swift and potent. It drove higher costs to employers and more government regulations.

Remembering Ed Carlson, Vietnam POW

Since last Veteran’s Day, Ken Burns’ in-depth documentary on the Vietnam War has aired. It is a powerful reminder of an unpopular war in which many “baby boomers” fought and died.

Rural prosperity essential to Washington

While Seattle is growing rapidly, our rural areas continue to struggle. They don’t have the corporate giants such as Amazon, Microsoft and Boeing creating jobs and economic opportunities. Farms are predominantly family-owned.

Amazon’s plan reminiscent Boeing’s Chicago move

Last year, Seattle Times aerospace reporter Dominic Gates wrote about the similarities and differences between Boeing’s corporate office move to Chicago and Amazon’s plan for a second headquarters.

LiveLocal98022 meeting cancelled

Bob Green, the night’s speaker, notified the organization he couldn’t attend due to an illness.

Expanded Panama Canal among challenges for Washington Ports

The $5.4 billion spent to expand the Panama Canal is paying off for East Coast and Gulf of Mexico seaports; however, it is putting more pressure on the Northwest to remain competitive.

Players taking a knee hurting the NFL | Don Brunell

On a recent Saturday afternoon in Portland, a young woman stepped onto the playing field at the beginning of the University of Montana vs Portland State football game and started singing our national anthem. She immediately drew a blank on the words and briefly stopped, but as she started apologizing, the fans spontaneously took up the singing.

New metal collecting machine may clean up contaminated waters

There is a new machine being tested in Montana which could decontaminate toxic mine tailings while recovering valuable precious minerals for everyday use.

Workshop will focus on business, social media

All are invited to learn how social media can impact business and how it can be used to create a positive experience for customers.

Impact of Hirst decision must be address

In Washington, the legislative stalemate over permitting new household wells and the state’s construction budget has not only delayed needed funding for public projects, but triggered yet another salvo in the wider conflict over future supplies of fresh water for people, fish and farms.

Mitigate massive wildfire danger | Don Brunell

At last count firefighters were battling 82 major wildfires in 10 western states. The fires have already scorched 2,300 square miles of forests and range lands, dislocated thousands of people, and burned hundreds of homes and buildings.