Better Business Bureau hosts shred event

With nearly one thousand participants and more than 18 tons of personal documents destroyed, Better Business Bureau serving Alaska, Oregon and Western Washington and its partnering organizations wrap up a record-breaking BBB Secure Your ID Day.

With nearly one thousand participants and more than 18 tons of personal documents destroyed, Better Business Bureau serving Alaska, Oregon and Western Washington and its partnering organizations wrap up a record-breaking BBB Secure Your ID Day.

On April 26, 2014, BBB hosted three community outreach events—in Anchorage, Tigard and Tacoma—which were able to make a huge different within local communities.

  • 887 cars/visitors responsibly destroyed sensitive documents and gained valuable ID theft knowledge.
  • 36,533 pounds of documents were securely shredded.
  • 45 cell phones were gathered and recycled through Verizon’s HopeLine program.
  • 50 child ID kits were issued by Safe Streets in Tacoma to help protect young consumers.
  • 150 visitors attended the third Annual Financial Fitness Fair in Anchorage to obtain information on being more money-smart.
  • 20 free credit reports were provided to Financial Fitness Fair visitors.

 

Because all of the destroyed documents are recycled, these BBB events collectively saved—according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency:

  • 128,100 gallons of water;
  • 60.4 cubic feet of landfill space;
  • And, enough energy to power nine American homes for an entire year.

 

The next BBB Secure Your ID Day will occur in October 2014, with locations to be announced soon. Visit go.bbb.org/akorww-syid for more information.

 

BBB would like to thank the partners and sponsors that made these events possible: Wells Fargo, Shred Alaska, United Way of Anchorage, CINTAS, Legal Shield, Safe Streets, Print NW, LeMay America’s Auto Museum, KIRO Radio, KFQD, Tacoma Dome, Bridgeport Village, DirectBuy of Portland and Shred-It.

 

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