Chamber hears tips for thriving in a tough economy

At our chamber-sponsored February Business Breakfast we discussed how to make it through these tough economic times. According to Jeff Perlot, business management faculty member and small business adviser at Green River Community College, the first key is to keep moving. He compared it with a rock climber who sees a storm coming. If the climber stays frozen and tries to wait out the storm, they may never make if off the rock. You need to keep climbing. Stay disciplined. Pick a few key things you want to accomplish each day and do them. That’s the only way to get to the top. 

At our chamber-sponsored February Business Breakfast we discussed how to make it through these tough economic times. According to Jeff Perlot, business management faculty member and small business adviser at Green River Community College, the first key is to keep moving. He compared it with a rock climber who sees a storm coming. If the climber stays frozen and tries to wait out the storm, they may never make if off the rock. You need to keep climbing. Stay disciplined. Pick a few key things you want to accomplish each day and do them. That’s the only way to get to the top. 

Yes, getting through these times will require patience. But that doesn’t mean being passive. It means making small strides each day and being relentless. 

Below is a sampling of the brainstorming ideas our business leaders shared with each other at the chamber event.

Marketing: Network; be the local expert in your field; take advantage of benefits offered by your chamber of commerce; stay customer-focused; use your Web site; advertise consistently.

Manage cash: Control inventory; negotiate terms with vendors; offer discounts to customers who prepay.

Achieve and maintain operational excellence: Increase speed of delivery; increase efficiency (which lowers costs); increase quality (which lowers costs and increases customer satisfaction).

We invite businesses to visit www.enumclawbusiness.blogspot.com to get many more ideas and share some you may be practicing, whether a member of the chamber or not.

A very special thank you to Jeff Perlot for sharing his expertise with our business community. The Washington Chamber of Commerce Executives (WCCE) organization was so impressed with Enumclaw’s forward thinking and hosting this blog spot, the idea was shared as a “best practice” with chambers across the state, from Seattle to Spokane and every chamber, big and small, in between. Kudos, Enumclaw Chamber members, for your great ideas!

A very special welcome to our newest chamber members: Accurate Foundation Walls, Trina’s Cup of Joe, AJ’s Home Repair and Construction, Lake Wilderness Golf Course and Ameri Plan USA.

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