College, city teaming up to offer May 27 financing workshop

During these uncertain economic times, two things appear clear: first, that many businesses are struggling to make ends meet; and, second, that many business owners have questions about financing options and opportunities.

During these uncertain economic times, two things appear clear: first, that many businesses are struggling to make ends meet; and, second, that many business owners have questions about financing options and opportunities.

The recent federal stimulus package, which makes money available through Small Business Administration loan programs, only adds to the mix.

Keeping all that in mind, Green River Community College’s Small Business Assistance Center has teamed with the city of Enumclaw to offer a financing workshop at 7:30 a.m. May 27. The event is planned for the GRCC Enumclaw campus, room 15.

“Any business struggling with cash flow would do well to attend,” SBAC Director Deanna Burnett Keener said. “There are opportunities out there that people don’t realize.”

The federal stimulus bill – the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act – contained several provisions to help small businesses. In addition, there are other federal and state programs aimed at helping small businesses, which is defined by the SBA as any enterprise with fewer than 500 employees.

“There are a lot of questions about what is involved in the stimulus package,” Burnett Keener said, noting that a panel of experts will be available to help sort through the details. Expected to participate on the 27th are representatives from the:

• U.S. Small Business Administration;

• Washington State Department of Community Trade and Economic Development;

• Northwest Business Development Association;

• the City of Enumclaw;

• local banking community.

Those wishing to attend should e-mail ewilliams@greenriver.edu or call 253-288-3400.

Reach Kevin Hanson at khanson@courierherald.com or 360-802-8205.

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