Curtain opens at Interwest; owner is happy with warm Buckley welcome

The new Interwest Construction and Development facility along state Route 410 in Buckley already carries a regal-sounding monicker – Kessell’s Kingdom.

Joe Kessell has found a home for his Interwest Construction and Development company along state Route 410 in Buckley.

The new Interwest Construction and Development facility along state Route 410 in Buckley already carries a regal-sounding monicker – Kessell’s Kingdom.

Joe Kessell is the founder of the 25-year-old aggregate material transportation firm, which also has site development and general contracting divisions. He grimaced slightly when told of the informal new handle popularized by locals.

Kessell is quick to share credit for the effort to get his company’s new headquarters built.

“The success is more about the collective efforts of a contingent of devoted individuals than it is about me,” he said.

He said the new building accommodates all of Interwest’s needs, with its conference rooms, spacious individual offices, and exercise rooms and showers for truckers, to a dispatch and tracking system.

Kessell also had high praise for the city’s department heads who worked with Interwest, his sons, his wife Sharon, a Buckley native, and the entire Interwest crew.

“All of our employees have been so supportive of what we are trying to achieve here, but there have been times when I do not know what I would have done without Sharon,” Kessell said. “She has been my rock.”

Kessell said approximately 30 percent of his work force already lives on the Plateau and many others are considering moving to Buckley or the surrounding area.

“Buckley is a great environment in which to live and do business,” he said. “This entire community has welcomed us with open arms and the city could not have been more amenable during construction.” The process was relatively quick, he said, spanning 18 months from the time Interwest purchased the property to a June 3 dedication ceremony.

Kessell had a great deal of input when it came to the design of the multimillion dollar undertaking.

“I’m like a kid embarking on his first trip to Disneyland,” he said. “We are so damn glad to be in Buckley and it was really rewarding to hear the mayor saying that she considers this company’s new building to be the standard by which other businesses moving into this area should look to as an example. It makes us proud to take on this challenge and to be trailblazers of sorts.”

Kessell also said he can’t wait for his outfit to become more involved in the Plateau community. The company had a good start in that direction by building the Buckley Youth Activity Center.

Interwest, which has prioritized the Special Olympics as one of its paramount projects, will additionally be the sponsor of the June 20-21 Buckley Junior Log Show.

Kessell said he is shooting for a Saturday in June for a public open house, giving the community a chance to check out Buckley’s newest business.

Reach John Leggett at jleggett@courierherald.com or 360-802-8207.

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