Del’s will soon disappear; in it’s place will be Tractor Supply

Big changes are coming to a highly-visible, Griffin Avenue location in downtown Enumclaw. The existing Del’s Feed and Farm Supply will be torn down and a new building will rise in its place, operating as a Tractor Supply Co. store. Tractor Supply owns the Del’s locations.

Big changes are coming to a highly-visible, Griffin Avenue location in downtown Enumclaw.

The existing Del’s Feed and Farm Supply will be torn down and a new building will rise in its place, operating as a Tractor Supply Co. store. Tractor Supply owns the Del’s locations.

A soft opening is tentatively scheduled for early 2016, according to a press release issued last week by the Tennessee-based Tractor Supply Co.

All the activity will take place at 911 Griffin Ave., where Del’s Feed and Farm Supply has operated the past 10 years.

The current Del’s store will remain open until the tentative closing date of July 18. Construction at the site will begin in August for the new Tractor Supply store, which will be more than 21,000 square feet in size.

Tractor Supply will honor all existing warranties at nearby Del’s and Tractor Supply stores, as well as at the new store when it opens.

While the Enumclaw store is closed during construction, customers can visit Del’s Feed and Farm Supply locations in Buckley and Auburn or the Tractor Supply in Puyallup.

Tractor Supply Company, which bills itself as the largest rural lifestyle retail store chain in the United States, has been around since 1938. The company currently operates more than 1,400 stores in 49 states.

Enumclaw’s Tractor Supply store will offer merchandise for horses, livestock and pets as well as a broad selection of tools, hardware, light truck equipment, work clothing and an extensive line of seasonal products.

The Enumclaw store will employ 12 to 15 people.

For more information on Tractor Supply, visit www.TractorSupply.com.

 

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