Enumclaw High graduate opens law office in Bonney Lake

Joshua Anderson considers Oct. 13, 2008, as one of the highest points in his life. That’s the date when the 2001 Enumclaw High graduate discovered he’d passed the bar exam.

Joshua Anderson considers Oct. 13, 2008, as one of the highest points in his life. That’s the date when the 2001 Enumclaw High graduate discovered he’d passed the bar exam.

“I received the nod in October,” he said. “This is something I’ve always wanted to do.”

Anderson’s journey toward becoming an attorney has been arduous.

After his high school career, which included playing wide receiver and cornerback for the Hornets, he headed south to the University of San Diego and earned his bachelor of arts in political science and a minor in history in 2005. A scholarship to Gonzaga University in Spokane followed, where he studied law for a year before returning home to friends and family.

“I missed western Washington too much,” he said.

He continued his studies at Seattle University School of Law and graduated cum laude with his juris doctorate on May 18. But arriving there took determination like he’d never before faced. He referred to that period as “a trying time.”

“This whole year has been a big roller coaster,” he said. “I lost one of my best friends in April. Right after that, I graduated from law school and had to study for the bar – seven days a week, eight to 10 hours a day. I took two to three days off during my whole bar studies. It was the intensity; Monday through Sunday. It was studying almost every day.”

He took the bar exam July 23.

“There was so much writing on it – so much time, so much energy,” he said. “I’d given so much and didn’t want to let myself or anyone else down who had been pulling and praying for me.”

With the exam completed, Anderson, 25, took time to head for the sun and surf of San Diego and proposed marriage to Elizabeth Lampe. She said yes and the couple plans on marrying in April.

Then came the long wait for the exam’s results.

“It was the longest wait of my life,” he said. It didn’t help that his mail had been inadvertently placed in another mail box. Finally, Anderson searched the Internet on Oct. 13 and found out he’d passed.

At that point, he knew the pieces of the puzzle – the years of devoting so many studies toward his passion – had all come together. He’d arrived one step closer toward accomplishing his dream.

He opened his first law office in December after finding a prime corner location near Safeway in Bonney Lake that had been long-occupied by Debbie Mortell’s Farmer’s Insurance. His initial focus is set on personal injury but that may expand as he feels more comfortable.

The journey has been long but Anderson doesn’t regret his efforts and said he looks forward to representing his clients.

“You really feel like you have a stake in this person…to really represent those people who I can sympathize with and really feel strongly about getting behind,” he said. “If you do a good job, you can really make these peoples’ lives better. All in all, it makes me happy because I can go home at the end of the day and feel like I’m doing good for people.”

The law office is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and is at 21195 state Route 410 in Bonney Lake. The phone number is 253-862-1811.

Reach Judy Halone at jhalone@courierherald.com or 360-802-8210.

More in Business

Keep the holiday spirit all year long | Don Brunell

During the holidays, our thoughts naturally turn to giving — not just giving gifts, but donating our time and money to charities, disasters and community programs.

Remember 1993

Twenty-five years ago, business took a beating in Olympia. The swing to the left in the 1992 general election was swift and potent. It drove higher costs to employers and more government regulations.

Remembering Ed Carlson, Vietnam POW

Since last Veteran’s Day, Ken Burns’ in-depth documentary on the Vietnam War has aired. It is a powerful reminder of an unpopular war in which many “baby boomers” fought and died.

Rural prosperity essential to Washington

While Seattle is growing rapidly, our rural areas continue to struggle. They don’t have the corporate giants such as Amazon, Microsoft and Boeing creating jobs and economic opportunities. Farms are predominantly family-owned.

Amazon’s plan reminiscent Boeing’s Chicago move

Last year, Seattle Times aerospace reporter Dominic Gates wrote about the similarities and differences between Boeing’s corporate office move to Chicago and Amazon’s plan for a second headquarters.

LiveLocal98022 meeting cancelled

Bob Green, the night’s speaker, notified the organization he couldn’t attend due to an illness.

Expanded Panama Canal among challenges for Washington Ports

The $5.4 billion spent to expand the Panama Canal is paying off for East Coast and Gulf of Mexico seaports; however, it is putting more pressure on the Northwest to remain competitive.

Players taking a knee hurting the NFL | Don Brunell

On a recent Saturday afternoon in Portland, a young woman stepped onto the playing field at the beginning of the University of Montana vs Portland State football game and started singing our national anthem. She immediately drew a blank on the words and briefly stopped, but as she started apologizing, the fans spontaneously took up the singing.

New metal collecting machine may clean up contaminated waters

There is a new machine being tested in Montana which could decontaminate toxic mine tailings while recovering valuable precious minerals for everyday use.

Workshop will focus on business, social media

All are invited to learn how social media can impact business and how it can be used to create a positive experience for customers.

Impact of Hirst decision must be address

In Washington, the legislative stalemate over permitting new household wells and the state’s construction budget has not only delayed needed funding for public projects, but triggered yet another salvo in the wider conflict over future supplies of fresh water for people, fish and farms.

Mitigate massive wildfire danger | Don Brunell

At last count firefighters were battling 82 major wildfires in 10 western states. The fires have already scorched 2,300 square miles of forests and range lands, dislocated thousands of people, and burned hundreds of homes and buildings.