Enumclaw’s QFC debuts home delivery service

The first order is free, but other orders will come with a charge.

Go to www.qfc.com to start shopping from home. Photo by Ray Miller-Still

Go to www.qfc.com to start shopping from home. Photo by Ray Miller-Still

The following is a press release from Quality Food Center:

Enumclaw’s QFC shoppers now have access to home delivery, eliminating the need for a trip to the store.

Delivery service began Sept. 20 through a partnership with Instacart, an on-demand retail delivery service.

“We are listening to our customers who are telling us they want the convenience of shopping any way they choose,” said Suzy Monford, president of QFC. She noted that groceries can be delivered to a customer’s doorsteps as soon as two hours after they place an order.

How does the system work?

Customers place their orders through the “Delivery” link at www.qfc.com. The customer enters the ZIP code where the delivery will be scheduled then chooses from 40,000 offered products, including perishables, which are categorized and sorted. The customer builds a digital cart by clicking and adding products. Once the customer has completed building the online basket, a preferred delivery time between 9 a.m. and midnight can be selected. An Instacart shopper then hand-picks the items and delivers the order within a preferred one-hour time window.

There is a fee for home delivery that will be waived for first-time customers.

More in Business

The rare earth metal dilemma | Don Brunell

These 17 elements are critical for many products, from smart phones to major weapon systems.

Family-owned businesses are the backbone of America | Don Brunell

Family businesses account for 50 percent of our country’s GDP.

Keeping things natural come Hell or High Water

Desiree and Kevin Helfrick started their garden in a Seattle apartment. Now they’re in charge of 5 acres, growing organic veggies and taking care of their chickens.

Rogers opens chiropractic practice

Beau Rogers played college baseball until a career-ending injury, leading him down the path of chiropractics.

“Normandy Clicker” D-Day innovation

American troops were ingenious on the battlefield.

Max fix critical to Washington | Don Brunell

Things were going great until the two 737 Max crashes.

Could Seattle put on a World’s Fair today?

You have to wonder if a project of this scope and magnitude could happen today with endless hoops to jump through, mounds of government red-tape and construction costs which were unimaginable in 1960.

Thunder Dome grand opening inches closer to the starting line

The nonprofit museum’s goal is to raise money for epilepsy awareness, as well as provide a new entertainment and event venue for Plateau locals and visitors.

Removing Snake River dams is unwise | Don Brunell

The vast majority of fish that migrate up the fish passage survive.

Washington’s big tax pump | Don Brunell

Large banks, high-end home buyers and merchants in border communities are feeling the effects.

Buckley Market vendors provide plenty of variety

The new Buckley Public Market has taken a broad approach to attracting… Continue reading

Business is roaring at Leony’s

For the first installment of The Courier-Herald’s new “Business Scene” focus page, we took a look at the owners of the new winery on Railroad Avenue.