Fraudsters aim to score big during NFL playoffs | Better Business Bureau

With the Seattle Seahawks advancing into the first round of the NFL Playoffs, Better Business Bureau warns the faithful 12th Man to avoid too-good-to-be-true deals on tickets, travel packages and Hawk accessories.

With the Seattle Seahawks advancing into the first round of the NFL Playoffs, Better Business Bureau warns the faithful 12th Man to avoid too-good-to-be-true deals on tickets, travel packages and Hawk accessories.

“It’s game on for scammers,” says Tyler Andrew, CEO of Better Business Bureau serving Alaska, Oregon and Western Washington. “As fans we need to do our part in making sure that we’re dealing with trustworthy businesses and ticket brokers. Every year we see people taken for hundreds of dollars. This postseason it is imperative that consumers play it smart before handing over their hard earned cash.”

According to the Counterfeiting Intelligence Bureau, counterfeiting is one of the fastest growing economic crimes in modern times, accounting for $600 billion a year. In 2014, Federal agents seized more than $21.6 million in fake NFL merchandise during Operation Team Player.

This postseason avoid the blitz by executing the following before buying tickets and gear.

  • Start with trust. Use reputable and verifiable ticket resellers. BBB recommends the National Association of Ticket Brokers (NATB) as they offer a 200% money-back guarantee.
  • Read the fine print. Just because a travel package has “NFL Playoffs” in the name doesn’t mean it includes tickets; if game tickets are not explicitly mentioned in ads, do not assume they are included.
  • Understand the law. The U.S. Department of Transportation requires sellers to have tickets in-hand before they can advertise inclusive ticket/airfare packages.
  • Pass on the fakes. Be watchful for counterfeit merchandise sold at blockbuster prices. Official Seahawks gear can only be sold by authorized retailers.
  • Research hotels and locations. Dishonest businesses may advertise that they are close to the stadium or “walking distance” when in fact they are not, requiring extra expenditures for car rentals or taxis.
  • Get everything in writing. Before making payments, make sure contracts clearly outline all the terms and conditions of packages, including cancellation policies and related fees.

Never feel pressured to make immediate decisions; always take time to research travel plans and businesses at bbb.org/search.

 

More in Business

GE’s tumble from grace | Don Brunell

General Electric, once the world’s most valuable company, has been topped by Walgreens.

Vintage items, gifts and more at new Enumclaw shop

Featuring an eclectic mix of merchandise, partners Tori Ammons and Melissa Oglesbee… Continue reading

The role models around us

Sometimes, being a good role model is a good business decision, too.

Seattle’s misstep highlights need for new approach

Last week, Seattle’s City Council did an “about face” revoking the onerous… Continue reading

Washington’s expensive culvert court case

Too much money is spent in court where it should go to increasing the salmon population

Straw pulp looks like a game changer

250,000 tons of straw will soon be pulped for paper products.

Bad labels tough to shed

Seattle’s going to have a hard time battling the “anti-business” label.

Lt. Dan needs lots of helping hands

Gary Sinise formed the “Lt. Dan Band” in early 2004 and they began entertaining troops serving at home and abroad. Sinise often raised the money to pay the band and fund its travel.

New Enumclaw wine bar aims for broad audience

Bordeaux Wine Bar is scheduled to be open Wednesdays through Sundays.

Streamlining regulations makes more housing affordable

There were over 21,000 people homeless in Washington State last year.

New approaches needed to fight super wildfires | Don Brunell

Last year, wildfires nationwide consumed 12,550 square miles, an area larger than Maryland.

Skilled trade jobs go unfilled in our robust economy

Known as blue collar jobs, they routinely pay $45,000 to $65,000 a year or more.