Interwest owner happy with warm welcome

The new Interwest Construction and Development facility along state Route 410 in Buckley already carries a regal-sounding monicker – Kessell’s Kingdom.

The new Interwest Construction and Development facility along state Route 410 in Buckley already carries a regal-sounding monicker – Kessell’s Kingdom.

Joe Kessell is the founder of the 25-year-old aggregate material transportation firm, which also has site development and general contracting divisions. He grimaced slightly when told of the informal new handle popularized by locals.

Kessell is quick to share credit for the effort to get his company’s new headquarters built.

“The success is more about the collective efforts of a contingent of devoted individuals than it is about me,” he said.

He said the new building accommodates all of Interwest’s needs, with its conference rooms, spacious individual offices, and exercise rooms and showers for truckers, to a dispatch and tracking system.

Kessell also had high praise for the city’s department heads who worked with Interwest, his sons, his wife Sharon, a Buckley native, and the entire Interwest crew.

“All of our employees have been so supportive of what we are trying to achieve here, but there have been times when I do not know what I would have done without Sharon,” Kessell said. “She has been my rock.”

Kessell said approximately 30 percent of his work force already lives on the Plateau and many others are considering moving to Buckley or the surrounding area.

“Buckley is a great environment in which to live and do business,” he said. “This entire community has welcomed us with open arms and the city could not have been more amenable during construction.” The process was relatively quick, he said, spanning 18 months from the time Interwest purchased the property to a June 3 dedication ceremony.

Kessell had a great deal of input when it came to the design of the multimillion dollar undertaking.

“I’m like a kid embarking on his first trip to Disneyland,” he said. “We are so damn glad to be in Buckley and it was really rewarding to hear the mayor saying that she considers this company’s new building to be the standard by which other businesses moving into this area should look to as an example. It makes us proud to take on this challenge and to be trailblazers of sorts.”

Kessell also said he can’t wait for his outfit to become more involved in the Plateau community. The company had a good start in that direction by building the Buckley Youth Activity Center.

Interwest, which has prioritized the Special Olympics as one of its paramount projects, will additionally be the sponsor of the June 20-21 Buckley Junior Log Show.

Kessell said he is shooting for a Saturday in June for a public open house, giving the community a chance to check out Buckley’s newest business.

To comment on this story view it online at www.courierherald. Reach John Leggett at jleggett@courierherald.com or 360-802-8207.

More in Business

Streamlining regulations helps Americans compete

The cost of regulations is a key American competitiveness issue. It is a major reason our companies re-locate to other countries and our manufacturers and farmers have difficulties competing internationally.

Railroads implementing positive track

While the investigation continues into the deadly AMTRAK derailment near Dupont, the clock continues to tick on the implementation of Positive Track Control (PTC). The deadline is Dec. 31, 2018.

Keep the holiday spirit all year long | Don Brunell

During the holidays, our thoughts naturally turn to giving — not just giving gifts, but donating our time and money to charities, disasters and community programs.

Finding balance in occupational licensing

Recently, the Institute for Justice (Institute) determined state licensing barriers for lower-income workers and aspiring entrepreneurs not only hurts people trying to establish themselves in a profession, but annually drives consumer prices up by $203 billion.

Remember 1993

Twenty-five years ago, business took a beating in Olympia. The swing to the left in the 1992 general election was swift and potent. It drove higher costs to employers and more government regulations.

Remembering Ed Carlson, Vietnam POW

Since last Veteran’s Day, Ken Burns’ in-depth documentary on the Vietnam War has aired. It is a powerful reminder of an unpopular war in which many “baby boomers” fought and died.

Rural prosperity essential to Washington

While Seattle is growing rapidly, our rural areas continue to struggle. They don’t have the corporate giants such as Amazon, Microsoft and Boeing creating jobs and economic opportunities. Farms are predominantly family-owned.

Amazon’s plan reminiscent Boeing’s Chicago move

Last year, Seattle Times aerospace reporter Dominic Gates wrote about the similarities and differences between Boeing’s corporate office move to Chicago and Amazon’s plan for a second headquarters.

LiveLocal98022 meeting cancelled

Bob Green, the night’s speaker, notified the organization he couldn’t attend due to an illness.

Expanded Panama Canal among challenges for Washington Ports

The $5.4 billion spent to expand the Panama Canal is paying off for East Coast and Gulf of Mexico seaports; however, it is putting more pressure on the Northwest to remain competitive.

Players taking a knee hurting the NFL | Don Brunell

On a recent Saturday afternoon in Portland, a young woman stepped onto the playing field at the beginning of the University of Montana vs Portland State football game and started singing our national anthem. She immediately drew a blank on the words and briefly stopped, but as she started apologizing, the fans spontaneously took up the singing.

New metal collecting machine may clean up contaminated waters

There is a new machine being tested in Montana which could decontaminate toxic mine tailings while recovering valuable precious minerals for everyday use.