Protect youth from identity theft | Better Business Bureau

More than 16,000 children and young adults under the age of 19 fell victim to identity theft in 2012, according to the Federal Trade Commission; and many of these kids will likely struggle for years to clear their names.

  • Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:56pm
  • Business

More than 16,000 children and young adults under the age of 19 fell victim to identity theft in 2012, according to the Federal Trade Commission; and many of these kids will likely struggle for years to clear their names. With identity theft complaints up nationwide, Better Business Bureau serving Alaska, Oregon and Western Washington is helping families take the proper precautions.

Protect children’s identities by securely destroying any documents containing sensitive personal information, such as old school forms and medical bills.

Better Business Bureau is hosting three Secure Your ID Day events—which will offer free document shredding and cell phone recycling—at the following locations:

 

McClain Insurance Services Inc

10410 19th Ave SE Street 100

Snohomish Everett WA 98208

Oct. 19, 2013, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Shredding provided by Datasite Northwest

 

Honda Auto Center of Bellevue

13291 SE 36th Street

Bellevue, WA 98006

Oct. 26, 2013, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Shredding provided by American Data Guard

 

Lakewood Ford

11503 Pacific Highway

Lakewood, WA 98499

Oct. 26, 2013, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Shredding provided by LeMay Mobile Shredding

Simply drive up and drop off up to three bags or boxes of unwanted documents to have them securely destroyed on-site.

 

Unwanted cell phones will be accepted as part of Verizon’s HopeLine, which wipes data and donates the devices to victims of domestic abuse.

 

BBB representatives will be available to answer identity theft questions and provide advice for identity theft victims.

 

For event information, visit akorww.bbb.org/secure-your-id.

 

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