Scammers hope to win big during track and field trials | Better Business Bureau

The 2016 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials are returning to Eugene, Ore. July 1- 10. The Trials attract more than a thousand athletes to Hayward Field and thousands more will attend as spectators.

The 2016 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials are returning to Eugene, Ore. July 1- 10. The Trials attract more than a thousand athletes to Hayward Field and thousands more will attend as spectators.

This high-profile event is the pre-event before the 2016 Olympics hosted in Rio de Janeiro. Preparations are underway to make the city inviting to all of its guests. Unfortunately, large events such as these also attract con artists looking for potential victims.

Here are some scams to look out for when traveling and attending the big event:

Fake Olympic apparel. When buying merchandise online try buying directly from the Olympic stores. While shopping at the stadium be sure to buy from pre-approved vendors. While it might be tempting to purchase cheap counterfeit merchandise, remember that doing so diverts funds away from the games and into the hands of crooks.

Fake tickets. If tickets weren’t purchased on the TrackTown USA site or from a trusted online ticket seller there is a chance they could be a fake. If someone is offering tickets at a price lower than they are being sold through official sites —it’s likely a scam.

Rental house scams. Most attendees have already made their hotel accommodations, but for those waiting until the last minute keep in mind scammers are zeroing in on you. Scammers can easily hijack legitimate online listings and make it look like their own. To avoid getting caught up in a scam its best to deal directly with the property owner or manager.

Last minute travelers should consider finding accommodations through the Eugene Cascades and Coast Sports Commission or by using bbb.org to find a trusted business.

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