What did 2013’s disasters teach us | Small Business Administration

Small businesses were particularly hard-hit by the floods, tornados and wildfires that occurred in the U.S. in 2013. Some were even forced to close temporarily, causing economic injury to business owners and communities that were already struggling.

Small businesses were particularly hard-hit by the floods, tornados and wildfires that occurred in the U.S. in 2013.  Some were even forced to close temporarily, causing economic injury to business owners and communities that were already struggling.

The factors that lead to financial losses after a disaster, however, can be offset by having a recovery plan in place.

Join Agility Recovery and the U.S. Small Business Administration January 14 for a free webinar that will take a look at how small and large-scale disasters in 2013 caused business interruptions, and the lessons learned.

 

Topics will include:

•  A retrospective of 2013’s major events causing business interruptions

•  The latest trends in business continuity planning

•  Steps and tools your organization needs in order to be prepared

•  Actionable ideas that can be applied today to increase your organization’s preparedness

 

Since 2009, SBA has partnered with Agility to offer business continuity strategies via its “PrepareMyBusiness” website. Visit the site to check out past webinars and to download helpful disaster preparedness checklists.

 

The SBA provides disaster recovery assistance in the form of low-interest loans to homeowners, renters, private nonprofits and businesses of all sizes. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov/disaster.

 

WHAT:          “2013 Year-in-Review: Valuable Lessons & Best Practices

WHEN: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 – 2 – 3 p.m. EST

HOW: Space is limited. Register at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/711599609

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