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Enumclaw shop caters to all things canine | Wally's World

A huge, friendly, gentle, long-haired pile of dog comes loping up to me and crashes at my feet, where he examines me with large, curious eyes. My God, I think, what a beautiful creature!

I’m visiting the Cobber’s Pet Pantry at 1415 Blake St., across from Columbia Bank. If you have a dog or cat you should check this place out. Excluding a serious injury or sickness that requires a veterinarian, they’ve got every conceivable facility and service you could want for your pet.

One afternoon last week, I sat down with owner Tammie Waugh. As you’d probably suspect, she’s quite fond of animals. Much to her mother’s chagrin, when she was a child, Tammie started bringing all kinds of stray dogs and cats home and nursing them back to health. That she would eventually open a pet supply and grooming clinic didn’t surprise anyone.

So, Tammie and her employees will bathe, blow-dry, trim hair and cut nails until your pet is so clean and pretty he’ll strut around the living room – because he’ll also realize how attractive he is. Or, if you have the time to handle these chores yourself, they’ll sell you a toothbrush and the necessary soap and you can bathe your pet for yourself in one of their specially-designed tubs.

They also have the most nutritious food for your animal. According to Tammie, much of the fare we feed our pets isn’t good for them. Most popular dog and cat foods are full of carbohydrates, artificial flavors. food coloring and other junk, but short on protein. Then, when they suffer skin problems, itching and hair loss, we take them to the vet when, in many cases, a change in diet would solve the problem. (Our pets’ diets are as screwed up as our own.)

Tammie also sells leashes and clothing and balls and other toys and chewy treats that will clean an animal’s teeth and breath. And she has beds and blankets and rugs and climbing ladders (“cat trees”) for your kitty. Furthermore, she brings in specialists to train dogs, so the many canines sniffing and snooping around the place on any particular day are usually well behaved.

Tammie strives to keep everything environmentally safe and supports local family enterprises whenever possible;   for example, her cat ladders are constructed by individuals who use driftwood and old, cotton carpet remnants. Once a month, many of her clients gather for an evening of wine, cold cuts, and easy conversation. Of course, everyone brings a dog or two. It’s quite a novel mix; everything from a cocker spaniel to a Bernese Mountain dog. That last one is the big, shaggy critter that’s fond of crashing at my feet. He also likes to high-five.

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