Arts and Entertainment

Ballet Workshop closes season with 'Coppelia'

The Ballet Workshop will close its 2010-11 season with the ballet’s greatest comedy, Coppelia, a charming and sentimental tale of mistaken identity and a beautiful life-size dancing automaton. Performances are slated for 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday at the Enumclaw High School auditorium.

Tickets are on sale now at The Ballet Workshop, 360-825-2196 for $10 and $8. Group rates are also available. For information, go to www.theballetworkshop.com.

Presented in three acts, Coppelia is about a mysterious toy maker, Dr. Coppelius, who lives in the town square. He shares his house with a beautiful, life-size automaton, Coppelia, he created to keep himself company. Everyday, Coppelia is seated with her book on the front balcony of the toy maker’s workshop. His neighbor, Swanilda, and her fiancé, Franz, believe Coppelia is real. Franz falls in love with the beautiful doll. The adventure begins as both Franz and Swanilda sneak into the toy maker’s workshop, separately, to meet Coppelia.

The Ballet Workshop features pre-professional dancers of Plateau Ballet Repertory Theatre, the school’s youth ballet company. Senior Company member Gretchen Waller will lead the production in the role of Swanilda. She will be partnered by Reece Menzel, playing the role of Franz, and Frank Thompson’s will fill the role of Dr. Coppelius.

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