Not all pruning methods are created equal | The Evergreen Arborist

The spring pruning season is just around the corner. So it is nearly time to break out the loppers, clippers and saws. And do not forget the first aid kits.

The spring pruning season is just around the corner. So it is nearly time to break out the loppers, clippers and saws. And do not forget the first aid kits.

There are three major items to consider when planning your spring tree work. First, fruit trees will benefit from pruning to enhance fruit production. Second, pruning ornamental trees is completely different from pruning fruit trees. Third, if hiring someone to do the work, choose a reputable tree service or a professional arborist. Unfortunately, there are plenty of well-meaning folks who do not possess the knowledge of proper pruning techniques.

Fruit Trees

February through April is the traditional time for pruning fruit trees. If they have been pruned on a regular basis, they have developed numerous water sprouts. As a general rule, one-third or more can be thinned out. Most of the remaining sprouts should be shortened to 4 to 10 inches.

Caution! If all the sprouts are removed, a tree will bear little or no fruit.

Treat Ornamental Trees Gently

Avoid severe topping or aggressive pruning of any ornamental tree. This practice is far too widespread along many city streets and in mall parking lots. Not only is it ugly, but the resulting water sprouts are a survival response to replenish the lost food-manufacturing branches and leaves.

These fast-growing sprouts can grow 5 feet or more a year. This may require frequent work by maintenance crews that could have been avoided by proper thinning and pruning.

Often, a heavily-topped tree will reach its original height in just two to three years. But there will be many more branches to deal with than before that can cause maintenance nightmares.

Unfortunately, Mother Nature did a number on certain species — like flowering plums — during last year’s ice storm. The resulting masses of sprouts will provide challenges for the next few years.

Proper thinning can help renovate many of the trees.

Responsible tree services and certified arborists will discourage tree topping. The key to successful ornamental pruning is to have the final result look as if very little has been done to a tree or shrub.

Options for Overgrown Trees

If a tree is too wide or tall for its space, there are at least two options.

  1. Carefully select some of the longer, unsightly branches. Either cut them back to where they join a larger branch or the main trunk or lightly trim them back to a shorter length.
  2. Remove the tree and plant one that will grow to fill, not overcrowd, a chosen space. This is preferable to doing a severe pruning job. Take the height estimates on nursery labels with a grain of salt. Often they are conservative.

Do the Right Thing

Before starting to work on an ornamental tree, I often ask a homeowner what he or she wants a tree to look like. Sometimes I have to explain why their request may not be practical or healthy for a tree and we will discuss some options. This should be the approach of any knowledgeable and responsible tree pruner.

Sometimes a homeowner will tell me to “do what I think needs to be done.” This can be a dangerous instruction to give to a stranger because some tree pruners do not know the correct way to treat ornamental trees. The results may be painful to look at. And it might be even more painful to write a check.

Do-it-yourselfers should attempt to learn the proper techniques. If hiring the work done, find out what the pruner plans to do. Is he or she on the same wavelength as you? Feel free to request a list of references.

I always insist that a homeowner be present during a job. That way he or she can immediately approve of the work in progress or express concerns and be available to ask or answer questions.

Doing the right thing will result in happy trees, a happy homeowner and enhance the reputations of responsible tree services and arborists. A poor job is very noticeable and neighbors and passersby will wonder what the heck a homeowner or business is trying to do to its trees.

Dennis Tompkins, a Bonney Lake resident, is a certified arborist and certified tree risk assessor. He provides small-tree pruning, pest diagnosis, hazard tree evaluations, tree appraisals and other services for homeowners. Contact him at 253 863-7469 or email at dlt@blarg.net. Website: evergreen-arborist.com.

More in Life

Enumclaw High hosts 7th annual Empty Bowls event

The event, held at Enumclaw High School, will help fund the Enumclaw Food Bank and Plateau Outreach Ministries.

A modern fairytale with a twist

He did it on one knee. One knee, with a nervous grin… Continue reading

Read the first two books before tackling ‘Banished’

Well, look at you. And you do — ten times a day,… Continue reading

Breakfast for the Birds coming Feb. 21

Celebrate the coming of spring with breakfast, fun hats and Ciscoe Morris.

With help from ‘The Grumpy Gardener,’ you can prepare for spring | The Bookworm

Normally, you’d never allow it. Holes in your yard? No way! Trenches… Continue reading

How to keep The Courier-Herald visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections, and you might see less news. Here’s how you can fix that.

A small act of kindness can make a big impact | SoHaPP

Join SoHaPP’s book group this February to discuss “Wonder” by R.J. Palacio. Don’t have the book? Check it out at the Enumclaw Library or visit The Sequel.

This book will WOW you | Point of Review

Wow. Just… wow. Did you see that? Wasn’t it awesome? It was… Continue reading

EHS graduate McNab promoted to Lieutenant Colonel

Tom McNab was recently promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel in the United States Air Force.

White River Valley Museum opens “Suffer for Beauty” exhibit

Corsets, bras, and bustles, oh my! The White River Valley Museum is hosting its new event, “Suffer for Beauty,” which is all about the changing ideals of female beauty through the ages. The exhibit runs through June 17.

Library’s art and writing contest returns to Pierce County | Pierce County Library System

Pierce County teens are encouraged to express themselves through writing, painting, drawing and more for the annual Our Own Expressions competition, hosted by the Pierce County Library System.

‘School of Awake’ offers advice to adolescent girls

Twinkle, twinkle. For as long as you can remember, you’ve known how… Continue reading