Plateau artists fare well at fair

Two Enumclaw artists were among the top prize winners at the city of Enumclaw’s Base Camp juried art show during the Enumclaw fair.

“All About Me

Two Enumclaw artists were among the top prize winners at the city of Enumclaw’s Base Camp juried art show during the Enumclaw fair.

Ross Brown won the $1,000 Puget Sound Energy Purchase Award for his sculpture titled “Corporatotic Tumi No. 4.” Brown’s piece will now become part of the city’s collection.

His wife, Sharman Owings, earned the $500 Arts Alive! Local Artist Award for her oil painting titled “All About Me.”

Jim Clagg of Tacoma won the $500 Arts Alive! Iris McLaughlin Memorial Award for his painting titled “A View of Tacoma.”

Woodinville’s Linda Baker was the city’s $600 second-place winner for her “Sails” photograph.

Seattle-based artist Karen Richter took home $400 third-place honors for her piece titled “Breakfast Whites.”

City of Enumclaw Cultural Programs Manager Gary LaTurner said the event, in its 16th year, continues to draw artists and crowds. For example, he pointed out, last year Base Camp was Baker’s first entry into a juried art show and this year she was a winner.

“That’s what I like about this show,” LaTurner said. “There are artists who haven’t been working at it for years and then there are those who have, but it’s a good opportunity for those who haven’t.”

The exhibit features approximately 60 two- and three-dimensional pieces by artists who submitted photographs or slides of their work for consideration by the juror. This year’s juror was Esther Luttikhuizen, collections curator for the King County Public Art Collection. She selected the images for acceptance in the exhibit and also the winners.

One award is chosen each year by those who visit the exhibit. This year’s People’s Choice Award winner was xxxxxx. They will receive $xxx that was collected in donations.

More than 100 people attended a July 15 artists’ reception at the fairgrounds.

To comment on this story, view it online at www.courierherald.com. Reach Brenda Sexton at bsexton@courierherald.com or 360-802-8206.

More in Life

White River Valley Museum opens “Suffer for Beauty” exhibit

Corsets, bras, and bustles, oh my! The White River Valley Museum is hosting its new event, “Suffer for Beauty,” which is all about the changing ideals of female beauty through the ages. The exhibit runs through June 17.

Library’s art and writing contest returns to Pierce County | Pierce County Library System

Pierce County teens are encouraged to express themselves through writing, painting, drawing and more for the annual Our Own Expressions competition, hosted by the Pierce County Library System.

‘School of Awake’ offers advice to adolescent girls

Twinkle, twinkle. For as long as you can remember, you’ve known how… Continue reading

Mental health first aid training in Enumclaw | The Summit

Friday, January 19 at 7 p.m., Dr. Michelle Bengtson will kick off the mental health-themed weekend by speaking on Hope for Depression: The World’s Greatest Epidemic. Dr. Bengtson is the author of the award winning “Hope Prevails: Insights from a Doctor’s Personal Journey through Depression.”

Print 3-D creations at Pierce County Library System

Bring a ready-to-print file and watch the magic of 3-D printing bring the file to life at Pierce County Library System’s 3-D Print Shop. The free print shop sessions are offered January through March at Pierce County Libraries, giving people the opportunity to use the 3-D printers to create items, get quick design lessons, and learn the 3-D printing process.

The past is the past, a review of ‘Robicheaux’

You don’t want to talk about it. You’ve been through rough times,… Continue reading

What would MLK do? A review on ‘Dear Martin’

What if your entire future was mapped out for you? All you’d… Continue reading

Blaine Larsen returns home for Dec. 2 concert

Blaine Larsen doesn’t perform much these days, instead spending his waking hours pursuing a higher calling.

Get your fill of winter activities on Mount Rainier

Mount Rainier’s landscape undergoes a dramatic transformation in winter.

Most Read