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Work begins Monday on Newaukum Creek bridge; traffic will detour for three months

Work will begin Monday, July 11, on a project to replace a bridge over Newaukum Creek near Enumclaw.

The 16-foot concrete bridge carries Southeast 416th Street over Newaukum Creek, and is located about two-tenths of a mile west of 278th Way Southeast. The roadway in that location will be closed for approximately three months until the new bridge is complete.

The bridge was originally built in 1926 and widened in 1969. It currently is supported by shallow concrete footings that have been partially undermined by flood waters.

During construction, the King County Road Services Division will demolish the existing bridge and build a new concrete bridge, supported by steel piling. Work will include demolition, pile driving and the construction of abutment walls, retaining walls, approach slabs and the bridge superstructure. Guardrails will be added, vegetation will be planted and utilities will be relocated.

Signs will direct motorists along a detour route. Some of the roads in the detour route are being repaved this summer, so drivers should expect traffic delays.

Those with questions about the project or wishing to receive e-mail alerts can contact DeAnna Martin, King County Department of Transportation community relations planner, at 206-684-1142 or deanna.martin@kingcounty.gov.

There is a project website at www.kingcounty.gov/roadscip. Type project number 3042 into the search box to view more information about the project and detour route.

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