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Fourth of July fireworks display moved to Enumclaw School District grounds | Fireworks

Enumclaw Fourth of July Fireworks display. - Photo courtesy Google Earth and city of Enumclaw
Enumclaw Fourth of July Fireworks display.
— image credit: Photo courtesy Google Earth and city of Enumclaw

The Fourth of July fireworks celebration planned for the Expo Center has taken a quick right turn and shifted locations because of the proximity of bald eagle nest.

Mayor Liz Reynolds on Wednesday reported the display has been relocated to Enumclaw School District property between the soccer fields located at Southwood Elementary and the Boise Creek Sixplex Park. Viewing of the fireworks will be from the soccer fields.

"Thank you Enumclaw School District and Superintendent Mike Nelson for saving the Fourth of July celebration," Reynolds said.

The mayor stated there will be no personal fireworks allowed.

The city was notified on June 12 by Lindsy Wright, U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist, of a bald eagle nest within a half-mile of the traditional fireworks site at the Expo Center. Because there is not a wooded area between the display and nest, the distance between the fireworks and nest needs to be one mile, according to the Federal Eagle Act, meaning there was not a viable spot on the Expo Center grounds for the fireworks to be ignited.

In the letter sent to the city, Wright wrote, "This is a new nesting pair in this area, and we suspect this is their first nest. The nesting pair have two eaglets currently in the nest, and neither the adults or eaglets are likely acclimated to loud intermittent noise associated with fireworks, therefore, we expect that disturbance is likely to occur.

"Based on the timing the pair started nesting, and the color and size of the eaglets at present, the two eaglets in the nest will likely be fledging near the time of the fireworks display is proposed to occur at the fairgrounds. Loud intermittent noises startle bald eagles and can cause the juveniles to jump or prematurely leave the nest before they can fully fly, potentially resulting in injury or death."

A violation of the Eagle Act, according to U. S. Fish and Wildlife, "can result in a fine of $100,000 ($200,000 for organizations), imprisonment for one year, or both, for a first offense. Penalties increase substantially for additional offenses, and a second violation of this Act is a felony."

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