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100 years on the Plateau | Pictorial

A view of the newly installed revolving coal car tipple at the bunkers of the Cannon mine in Franklin, just north of Enumclaw, circa 1913.  - Photo courtesy Pacific Coast Coal Co.
A view of the newly installed revolving coal car tipple at the bunkers of the Cannon mine in Franklin, just north of Enumclaw, circa 1913.
— image credit: Photo courtesy Pacific Coast Coal Co.

A view of the newly installed revolving coal car tipple at the bunkers of the Cannon mine in Franklin, just north of Enumclaw, circa 1913.

Loaded coal cars would be moved into the large cylinders, which would clutch the wheels of the coal cars and turn them upside down, so coal could fall into the hoppers below. The machine built for Franklin were the largest ever manufactured.

They took four loaded cars at a time and in one operation dumped them and returned them to the track. The four cars contained up to five tons of coal or rock. As there were two cylinders, the double machine handled 10 tons in about two and one-half minutes. These machines were built in Seattle.

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