Buckley teen to build relationships, sport court in Panama

Hannah Weymiller, 14, recently received a $1,000 scholarship for the trip.

Hannah Weymiller received a $1,000 scholarship Saturday from Luke Guthrie, owner of Prime Ops Security. Submitted photo

Hannah Weymiller received a $1,000 scholarship Saturday from Luke Guthrie, owner of Prime Ops Security. Submitted photo

Hannah Weymiller will spend part of her summer vacation, 3,600 miles removed from her Buckley home, volunteering on a project aimed at bringing joy to kids in Central America.

The 14-year-old Weymiller and a handful of her Bellarmine Preparatory School classmates have joined forces with Courts For Kids. They will spend 10 days in Panama building a sports court in an underprivileged community.

Her trip carries a $2,200 price tag and Weymiller received nearly half her goal in the form of a scholarship from Prime Ops 911 Security. The company provides scholarship money for teens doing good deeds. She received her award during a ceremony on Jan. 12.

“I will be traveling to and living in a small community about 4 ½ hours outside of Panama City,” Weymiller explained in her application letter. “Together with my group, I will be working on a project to build a sports court for this community. This sports court will provide not only a safe place for children to play but also other benefits, like becoming a community meeting and gathering place for villagers.”

The sports angle fits with one of Weymiller’s passions. The Bellarmine Prep freshman plays club volleyball, intends to play through high school, and hopes to compete collegiately. But she’s plenty busy away from athletics, often performing community service. She was one of the top five recipients of the Service Above Self Award while attending eighth grade at North Tapps Middle School and has volunteered at a local veterinary clinic, helped deliver to the Sumner Food Bank and assisted with the Enumclaw Special Olympics swim team.

Courts For Kids in a nonprofit organization based in Vancouver, Washington. The CFK website notes that 162 courts have been built in 28 partner countries with the help of 3,200 U.S. participants.

More in News

Myriad services offered at resource fair

The Enumclaw library and the Escuela de la Vida is hosting a resource fair for everyone this Friday, Oct. 18.

Black Diamond council member identified as a ‘Three Percenter.’ What does that mean?

Some Three Percent groups are armed militias patrolling the southern border. Others join far-right rallies with white supremacy groups. Chris Wisnoski said his organization, the Washington State Three Percent, is not affiliated with the national movement and focuses more on charitable works and community preparedness.

Malena Gaces, left, and other members of Washington CAN protest unfair move-out charges and alleged discriminatory behavior outside Kitts Corner Apartments in Federal Way in 2018. Sound Publishing file photo
King County could increase tenant protections

The council is considering ordinances designed to help renters.

Manhunt for convicted sex offender ends with arrest in Enumclaw

Upon his release, Ronald Clayton cut off his GPS tracker and obtained enough meth for a felony charge.

Voters being asked to approve levy for White River schools

If passed, residents will be taxed $2.50 per $1,000 APV from 2020 through 2022.

The 2015 Wolverine Fire in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest near Lake Chelan. Photo courtesy of the Washington Department of Natural Resources.
The smoky summer that wasn’t

While Washington had a mild season, wildfires burned near the Arctic.

Annual coat drive helps battle the winter chill

Gamblin Motors is hosting the drive through Nov. 30.

All invited to attend kick-off conversation about affordable housing

The Calvary Presbyterian church will be hosting a “community conversation” on affordable housing on Oct. 26.

City to keep some sales tax revenue, use money to help with affordable housing

A bill passed in last year’s legislative session allows cities to keep funds for affordable housing by seeking a credit against the state’s share of local sales taxes.

Most Read