Campfires banned across the state | Department of Natural Resources

With the arrival this week of the most dangerous fire weather of the year, Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark is expanding the statewide burn ban effective noon yesterday, Aug. 17 to prohibit all campfires on DNR-protected lands through Sept. 30, 2016.

With the arrival this week of the most dangerous fire weather of the year, Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark is expanding the statewide burn ban effective noon yesterday, Aug. 17 to prohibit all campfires on DNR-protected lands through Sept. 30, 2016.

“After a relatively mild summer, we are entering a period of critical fire weather on both sides of the Cascades,” said Goldmark. “The greatest fire danger right now comes from carelessness. It’s essential that people understand the risks involved and do not spark any fires.”

Goldmark sees special wildfire risk over the coming days throughout the state, as high-pressure weather patterns will keep away the marine moisture that normally limits the spread of wildfire. The ability of Washington’s forests and grasslands to resist wildfire remains weakened after last year’s record drought.

The statewide burn ban applies to state forests, state parks and forestlands protected by DNR firefighters. It prohibits all outdoor burning, including campfires in fire pits and the use of charcoal briquettes. Liquid or propane camp stoves that do not use solid briquettes and have on/off controls are permitted.

The statewide ban does not include federally-owned lands such as national forests, national parks, national wildlife refuges or other areas administered by federal agencies.

This fire season to date, there have been 527 fires on 3,372 acres. By comparison, at this point in 2015, there had been 803 fires burning 319,551 acres. In 2014 by this date, there were 590 fires burning 190,742 acres.

In 2015, a record drought, low snowpack and weeks of hot, dry weather brought Washington’s worst-ever wildfire season, burning more than a million acres across the state.

“Our fire crews have been effective so far this season in keeping fires small and getting them out quickly,” said Goldmark. “I ask all Washingtonians to give them a hand by being careful and responsible when working or playing on our iconic landscapes.”

More in News

Black Diamond supports recall as OPMA lawsuit comes to an end

Councilwoman Pat Pepper will most likely be recalled as soon as the February special election is certified Friday, Feb. 23.

State Patrol now ticketing for E-DUIs; insurance premiums may be affected

When the law was passed last year, WSP was just giving warnings. Now, drivers will be pulled over and ticketed with an E-DUI for using electronics behind the wheel.

POM Executive Director moving on | Plateau Outreach Ministries

Britt Nelson will be leaving her position as head of the organization in June.

Local museums to participate in Pierce County history event

The Foothills Historical Museum in Buckley, the Greater Bonney Lake Historical Society, the Carbon River Corridor/Wilkeson Historical Society and the Sumner Historical Society are coming together Feb. 24.

Largest Salmonella outbreak linked to live poultry | Department of Health

There were more than 1,000 Salmonella cases nationally last year.

Bonney Lake council starts pool talks, considers forming metro parks district

The last metropolitan parks district the city asked voters to approve failed in 2013, with 80 percent of voters against it. But an energetic group of folks who want a city pool could change that in the near future.

Enumclaw Council agrees to earlier starting time

Instead of 7:30 p.m. on Moondays, the council will now meet at 7 p.m. sharp.

Enumclaw High hosts 7th annual Empty Bowls event

The event, held at Enumclaw High School, will help fund the Enumclaw Food Bank and Plateau Outreach Ministries.

Most Read