Cascade announces 2018 milfoil treatment plan for Lake Tapps | Cascade Water Alliance

Don’t be caught swimming in the areas being treated with pesticides.

The various areas on the lake where Cascade Water Alliance will be treating milfoil in Lake Tapps. Image courtesy Cascade Water Alliance

The various areas on the lake where Cascade Water Alliance will be treating milfoil in Lake Tapps. Image courtesy Cascade Water Alliance

Cascade Water Alliance, which owns and operates the Lake Tapps Reservoir, conducted two milfoil surveys this spring. Based on these surveys, Cascade is announcing its 2018 planned milfoil treatment.

The areas designated to receive treatment are marked on the attached map. Treatment will occur during July. Residents in planned treatment areas will be notified regarding time and dates of treatment prior to actual application. There will be some chemical treatment as well as divers pulling milfoil.

Treatments will include the aquatic herbicides RenovateOTF (triclopyr) and Reward (diquat). The Washington Department of Ecology recommends not swimming in the area treated by Renovate OTF for at least 12 hours post treatment, and for 24 hours where Reward has been used.

For aquatic plant management options for lakefront property owners at Lake Tapps, see the Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Aquatic Plant Removal or Control, which includes the WDFW’s Aquatic Plants & Fish Pamphlet.

Milfoil is found in most Northwest lakes. It has been in Lake Tapps on and off for years. Milfoil is no longer classified as a noxious weed, and therefore, Cascade has no legal obligation to address milfoil.

However, Cascade is as interested as residents and recreation enthusiasts in keeping the reservoir clean and safe. This is why, over the past decade, Cascade has treated and addressed milfoil management on a regular basis at its own cost.

Cascade does not manage natural vegetation.

Depending on the aquatic herbicides selected, some areas of the reservoir may be treated two to three times over a 10 to 12 week period. Others may not receive any treatment.

If you see milfoil feel free to contact Cascade at contact@cascadewater.org and send us pictures and let us know the location you have seen it.

In addition, Cascade has teamed up with the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department to offer residents TappsWise, a natural yard care and septic system maintenance program to keep Lake Tapps clean and healthy.

For more information visit www.cascadewater.org.

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