Concert to benefit Mount Peak tower effort

The Mount Peak Historical Fire Association may be getting some state money, but the group is also hoping to garner some local support to revive the historic landmark.

A digital rendering of what the proposed Mount Peak lookout tower would look like. The Washington state capital budget includes $381,000 that would go toward funding the project, if the it passes. Courtesy image

A digital rendering of what the proposed Mount Peak lookout tower would look like. The Washington state capital budget includes $381,000 that would go toward funding the project, if the it passes. Courtesy image

Three bands, all with direct ties to the Enumclaw community, will play a fundraising concert in support of a proposed Mount Peak lookout tower.

The concert is slated for Saturday, April 20, at Enumclaw’s Chalet Theatre. The doors open at 7 p.m. and music gets rolling at 8. Admission is $20 and all proceeds will benefit the tower effort.

Performing will be Chicken Wire, featuring Enumclaw teacher Seth Polson and Enumclaw High graduate Mike Chang; The Forgotten 45s, which includes EHS grads Michael Rossi and Nolan McSheridan; and CGC, featuring EHS teacher Victor Wallace, former EHS teachers Doug Wolff and Brian Patrick, and local dentist Scott Decker.

Putting a lookout tower atop iconic Mount Peak is a grassroots, all-volunteer effort tied to Enumclaw’s past. For years, the state maintained a fire lookout at the top of the popular landmark and it could be seen from miles around. Likewise, the tower provided incredible views, reportedly as far north as Elliott Bay in Seattle.

After a run of nearly four decades, the era of “fire watchers” came to a close in 1964. Not long after, in 1966, the Mount Peak tower was torn down to eliminate safety concerns.

Hoping to see a bit of Mount Peak glory returned is the Mount Peak Historical Fire Association. The group envisions a tower that would be used strictly for Mount Peak hikers. Since its inception, the group has hosted public meetings, gained nonprofit status and received the blessing of King County, which owns the property.

The volunteer effort received good news recently when the Washington House of Representatives released its 2019-21 capital budget. Included was an appropriation of $381,000 for the lookout tower.

While that is viewed as a positive step, it’s only part of the budgeting process. The capital budget has moved to the state Senate for further consideration.

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