New signs will soon be placed around downtown Enumclaw, letting people know the new time limit (3 hours) and the new fine ($40) for parking longer than allowed. Photo by Dennis Box

Enumclaw Council OKs parking changes, doubles fine for violators

Those who regularly park in downtown Enumclaw have suspected change was in the air, but now it’s official.

Those who regularly park in downtown Enumclaw have suspected change was in the air, but now it’s official.

Members of the City Council voted unanimously to alter the rules in the heart of the business district, allowing vehicles to sit longer but cracking down on those who violate the parking code.

The issue of downtown parking has come and gone multiple times through the years. It was raised again in May by the Enumclaw Chamber of Commerce and, during a meeting with key stakeholders, it was emphasized that downtown merchants value on-street parking for visitors and shoppers.

The end result was an ordinance passed Oct. 9 that extends downtown parking to three hours, instead of the current two-hour limitation. But for those who get caught extending their stay, the fine doubles from the current $20 to $40 per offense.

Equally important, the council-approved ordinance directs that the Enumclaw Police Department begin enforcing the parking regulations. Historically, parking has been a low-priority item, getting attention only when complaints are made or hazards are created.

New signage will spell out parking rules on the following: Cole Street and Railroad Street, from Washington Avenue to Stevenson Avenue; and Griffin, Initial, Myrtle and Marshall avenues, all between Railroad and Wells streets.

Downtown merchants, in advocating for a change, noted that parking spaces can potentially equate to $15,000 in annual revenues.

In other action during their Oct. 9 meeting, members of the Enumclaw City Council:

• honored a request by developers of Lily Estates, keeping the project on the city books for another 12 months.

The proposal, which calls for turning 4.7 acres of land into 17 building lots, has been in the works since 2007 and was set to expire. The council was told the applicant wants to get to work on the project but required an extension.

The proposed Lily Estates extends north off McHugh Avenue, east of Parter Street. Plans call for single-family homes fronting a new north-south road.

• approved an agreement that keeps Enumclaw at the table of the South County Area Transportation Board.

Since 1992, the city has been part of the organization that examines transportation issued impacting the southern portion of the county. The present agreement is set to expire and the end of this year; it is now replaced with a two-year agreement and carries an automatic two-year extension, keeping Enumclaw in the mix through 2021.

The Transportation Board consists of 16 cities, along with King County and the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe.

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