Enumclaw’s Scott Gray appointed to serve on King County’s 4Culture task force

“Scott’s experience working on the King County Fair will add valuable insight as we look at how to make arts and culture funding work for the entire county.”

While being nominated to the 4Culture task force, Scott Gray, left, is stepping down as Executive Director of the Enumclaw Expo Center with Rene Popke, right, taking over. Photo by Kevin Hanson

While being nominated to the 4Culture task force, Scott Gray, left, is stepping down as Executive Director of the Enumclaw Expo Center with Rene Popke, right, taking over. Photo by Kevin Hanson

Enumclaw’s Scott Gray has been appointed by the Metropolitan King County Council to serve on the King County 4Culture task force.

Gray’s nomination received unanimous support during the council’s July 30 meeting. He will represent Council District 9.

“Scott’s experience working on the King County Fair will add valuable insight as we look at how to make arts and culture funding work for the entire county,” Councilman Reagan Dunn said. Dunn is an elected member of the County Council, representing District 9.

After spending more than three decades with the Pepsi-Cola Co. and Hostess Foods, Gray was once prepared to enjoy retirement. That changed in 2012 when he took a position as sales manager of The Courier-Herald; that stint ended with his involvement in the Enumclaw Expo Center Advisory Board, a volunteer effort that led to his appointment as executive director of the Enumclaw Expo and Events Association. He has been in charge of all activities at the Expo Center and the 72-acre grounds, a position he will be leaving later this year.

His community involvement also involved a tour through the officers’ ranks with the Enumclaw Chamber of Commerce.

King County’s arts and heritage programs are administered by 4Culture, the quasi-governmental Cultural Development Authority. 4Culture receives a portion of hotel/motel tax revenues to advance arts and heritage programs through competitive grants that provide support for arts and heritage facilities, productions, cultural education and collaborative projects. In addition, 4Culture administers King County’s One Percent for Art program, which incorporates public art into qualified capital projects.

The 4Culture task force, consists of 27 members which will prepare an assessment of 4Culture’s governance structure, processes and practices by Feb. 1, 2019.

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