The Enumclaw Transfer Station took in more than 21,000 tons of garbage and 25.5 tons of recyclables and compostables in 2016. Photo by Kevin Hanson.

Expanded hours at the Enumclaw Transfer Station

Customers who use Enumclaw’s recycling and transfer station will soon be able to access the facility seven days a week. The site – which is operated by King County’s Solid Waste Division – is now open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. It currently is closed to the public on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

5/4/2017 correction: Before the Enumclaw Transfer Station updated its hours, it was open five days a week (closed Wednesdays and Thursdays). The station will now be open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The article has been updated.

Customers who use Enumclaw’s recycling and transfer station will soon be able to access the facility seven days a week.

The site – which is operated by King County’s Solid Waste Division – is now open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week.

“Employees working at the Enumclaw station on days when the facility was closed to the public say they have had to turn away customers who were coming to use the station,” said Pat McLaughlin, King County Solid Waste Division director.

Public feedback received during a 30-day comment period was unanimously supportive of the extended hours.

The recycling and transfer station is located at 1650 Battersby Ave., just east of Veazie-Cumberland Road. It serves residents and businesses largely from the Enumclaw, Black Diamond and Maple Valley areas.

In addition to accepting garbage, the station takes a wide variety of materials for recycling. Accepted are appliances, cardboard, paper, cans, glass bottles and jars, plastic containers, fluorescent bulbs and tubes, scrap metal, textiles, clean wood (untreated, unpainted and unstained) and yard waste.

Last year, the Enumclaw facility took in 1,715 tons of recyclables, an increase from 2015 when the total was 1,192. In 2014, the total reached 1,034 tons. Yard waste accounted for more than a third of all recyclables.

According to Solid Waste Division reports, King County residents and businesses recycle 54 percent of all solid waste generated, yet 70 percent of what is landfilled could have been reused, recycled, or composted.

The King County Solid Waste Division handled 25,560 tons of separated recyclable and compostable materials at its facilities in 2016, exceeding its goal of 24,000 tons.

The Enumumclaw facility took in more than 21,000 tons of garbage during 2016 and has collected nearly 5,900 tons thus far in 2017.

King County’s Solid Waste Division operates as part of the Department of Natural Resources and Parks. The Enumclaw facility is one of eight recycling and transfer stations throughout the county; garbage taken to the site is then hauled to the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill, the only landfill still in use by the county.

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