The Maleng Regional Justice Center is located at 401 4th Ave. N. in Kent. File photo

The Maleng Regional Justice Center is located at 401 4th Ave. N. in Kent. File photo

King County bans solitary confinement of juveniles

Policy shift comes as part of a settlement in response to a 2017 lawsuit

King County has agreed to ban solitary confinement of juveniles in county jails as well as pay four teens $215,000 to settle a lawsuit they filed last year over the county’s solitary confinement practices.

In Oct. 2017, with the help of the Seattle-based Columbia Legal Services firm, four teens filed a lawsuit in federal court alleging that they spent days in solitary confinement and were illegally denied educational services while in custody at the Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent. The suit also called for the county to eliminate solitary confinement for juveniles entirely.

Now, under the settlement, King County will eliminate the use of solitary confinement except in limited circumstances, and then for only short durations of time. The specifics of these exceptions have yet to be outlined, however, and will be negotiated between the county and Columbia Legal Services, according to Charlie McAteer, a spokesperson for the law firm. As the settlement is written, solitary confinement will be allowed when it is “necessary to prevent imminent and significant physical harm to the juvenile detained or to others and less restrictive alternatives were unsuccessful.”

The county has also agreed to work with a monitor who will provide regular reports to Columbia Legal Services and county officials on their solitary confinement practices. They’ve also promised to work with Columbia Legal Services to compose a new solitary confinement policy that includes a requirement that when juveniles enter solitary confinement, a mental health professional and a parent or legal guardian are notified within eight hours.

In addition to the $215,000 that the plaintiffs will evenly split among themselves, they will also receive $25,000 for legal fees.

“King County’s practice of isolating children is out of step with community values, the science, and generally accepted correctional standards because it is harmful to children and counterproductive,” said Nick Straley, an attorney with Columbia Legal Services in a Aug. 20 news release. “It’s past time to take a big step forward to eliminate the inhumane practice of isolation that harms already vulnerable children and violates their constitutional rights.”

The settlement also resolves a portion of the lawsuit that alleged that the county and the Kent School District failed to provide juveniles with adequate educational services while incarcerated. The Kent School District has also agreed to reform its policies for educating youth held at the Regional Justice Center and will pay the four plaintiffs $25,000.

The lawsuit only applied to juveniles who were charged as adults by prosecutors for particularly violent offenses, and were therefore held in adult detention facilities. The county has since moved all of its youths charged as adults to the existing youth detention center in Central Seattle. Prior to the 2017 lawsuit, King County Executive Dow Constantine directed the county to pursue a goal of zero youth detention.

In a statement, Constantine spokesperson Alex Fryer said that their office welcomes the presiding judge’s acceptance of their settlement agreement.

More in News

Changes to Black Diamond city code address attorney contracts

The city said it is clarifying the mayor has the power to hire and fire attorneys; some residents say this gives the mayor too much power.

Trash talk: Enumclaw renews solid waste pact with King County

Additionally, the public comment period for the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill in Maple Valley is open through Aug. 26.

Nuevo programa de biblioteca que incorpora grupos de recursos comunitarios

A new library program is having a mini-resource fair with Sea Mar and Colectiva Legal del Pueblo.

Candidates sought for posts where none filed

South Prairie and Wilkeson need someone to file to be a council member — the due date is Aug. 15.

Raising glasses, and funds, for wounded vets

The Aug. 15 “Pint Night” at Headworks Brewery will go to the Gary Sinise Foundation.

King County’s Prop. 1 parks levy is passing

Initial results from the Aug. 6 primary King County Council races are also in.

Preliminary results for August 2019 primary elections

The parks levy is passing, and Paul Fisher and Eric Heintzinger are leading the Enumclaw Fire Department commissioner race.

Work started on solution for Spiketon Bridge closure

The new temporary bridge, which will be two-lanes large and have no weight restrictions, is expected to be completed in October.

Next state park “free day” Aug. 25 | Washington State Parks

There are several state parks Plateau residents can enjoy nearby.

Suggestions for downtown lots pitched to City Council

The empty lot next to The Local coffeeshop could potentially be used for plant or art sales, or incorporated into the Sundays on Cole events.

Spring Chinook salmon. Photo courtesy Michael Humling, US Fish and Wildlife Service
State awards millions for salmon recovery

Puget Sound counties received more than $45 million.

Grocery store workers picket across King County

Union members are asking Kroger for living wages and more scheduling predictability.