Jan Molinaro stands next to Enumclaw’s newest time capsule, which was created by local student and boy scout Ethan Thorley and other members of Troop 303, Nathan Erickson, Chad Jimenez, and Steven Reindeau. Photo by Ray Miller-Still

Jan Molinaro stands next to Enumclaw’s newest time capsule, which was created by local student and boy scout Ethan Thorley and other members of Troop 303, Nathan Erickson, Chad Jimenez, and Steven Reindeau. Photo by Ray Miller-Still

Public invited to help dedicate Enumclaw time capsule

The event is at 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 27 at City Hall.

A collection of “life in Enumclaw” items will be locked away Sunday afternoon, to be kept sealed until the city’s sesquicentennial anniversary in 2063.

The public is invited to gather at City Hall for the 3 p.m. dedication of the time capsule.

The brainchild of Mayor Jan Molinaro, the time capsule – a hand-crafted wooden box – will contain assorted items designed to give a picture of what life was like in 2018. It is to be opened in connection with the city’s 150th anniversary.

Molinaro said his plan was sparked during his travels, after visiting a museum and seeing what that community had done. He figured it was appropriate to base Enumclaw’s effort around the community’s 150th anniversary.

Molinaro announced the project in August, encouraging local individuals and groups to submit items for consideration. The theme was rather straightforward: What is it like to live in Enumclaw in 2018?

One of the mayor’s favorite items for the time capsule is a collection of post cards, written by Enumclaw School District students and addressed to their future selves. They will be made available to the writer in 2063.

The plan, Molinaro said, is to keep the time capsule on display in the City Hall lobby.

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