Sumner district students to sing with national choir

The American Choral Directors Association was founded in 1959 and holds a annual national conference. This year 308 girls were selected to the national honor choir and will travel to Salt Lake City in late February. Selected to participate in the four-day conference are a pair of eighth graders from Mountain View Middle School and a ninth grade student from Bonney Lake High School.

The American Choral Directors Association was founded in 1959 and holds a annual national conference.

This year 308 girls were selected to the national honor choir and will travel to Salt Lake City in late February.

Selected to participate in the four-day conference are a pair of eighth graders from Mountain View Middle School and a ninth grade student from Bonney Lake High School.

Emma Crick and Queency Robinson were chosen out of more than 3,300 applicants nationwide.

Both girls have been performing since they were young.

Emma said she has been singing for most of her life.

She was introduced to music by her parents who also sang in their middle and high school choirs.

Emma said her dad owned a large collection of CD’s, cassette tapes and vinyl records that he would often play for her.

“I learned to sing along,” she said. “(And) before my dad passed away in 2013, he gave the collection to me. I listen to his music all the time.”Queency was also introduced to music at a young age.

At 4 years old, she started performing in talent shows, at church services and choir concerts.

Aside from singing, Queency said she also plays the piano and cello.

In order for Emma and Queency to be part of the honor choir along with 306 other girls, they first had to be invited.

Emma said their choir teacher Carrie Scott brought this opportunity to their attention.

To audition, they had to learn Hallelujah Amen by Handel, record it and send the recording to be judged.

“It was pretty nerve-wracking because a voice recording can be totally different from (your) actual voice,” Queency said.

Emma said the recordings are considered a blind audition where the judges did not know their names or where they were from.

Both Emma and Queency agree that this is a great opportunity.

Queency said this experience will “look impressive (on her) record.” She added it will also allow her to incorporate both her leadership skills and musical skills into one experience.

Queency is vice president of the associated student body along with being part of two leadership clubs.

“Being a great role model is something I take very seriously,” she said.

Adding, this trip will allow her the chance to show others it is worth taking chances.

While in Salt Lake City, Emma said the trip is heavily structured.

They will be practicing for roughly eight to 10 hours a day with small performances during the week.

On the final day, she said, all the singers will perform together with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

David Archuleta from American Idol will also be there during the final performance.

Emma’s mom will be chaperoning the trip and Emma hopes they are able to do some sightseeing if time allows.

Queency said she is excited for the snow they may see in Utah.

For both girls, they see themselves continuing to participate in choirs into high school as well as in college.

But for Emma, she sees it going farther than that.

She said she wants to become an actress, model and/or performer.

And she also has a back up plan.

“It that doesn’t work out, I’m going to become a nurse,” Emma said.

As for Queency, she doesn’t see singing as a career.

She hopes to go to college and study musical engineering.

Both Emma and Queency have been raising money to attend the conference.The estimated cost is $2,500 each.

“My friends and family have been so supportive with my fundraising,” Queency said. “We’re halfway there.”

Both Emma and Queency have a GoFundMe page set up.

“This experience would be a great asset to my future,” Queency said.

 

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