A large crowd turned out July 7 for the first installment of 2019’s Sundays On Cole. Last year’s series was deemed a success and all signs point to another good year. Photo by Kevin Hanson

A large crowd turned out July 7 for the first installment of 2019’s Sundays On Cole. Last year’s series was deemed a success and all signs point to another good year. Photo by Kevin Hanson

Sundays On Cole opens season with more vendors

There is also more entertainment and beer options.

By all accounts, last year’s maiden voyage of Sundays On Cole was a success. And now, as organizers have waded into season two, it appears the open-air market is bigger and better.

At least, that’s the official word from the Chamber of Commerce. The business-boosting organization, along with LiveLocal 98022, has assumed control of the eight-Sunday event, which was kicked off last year by the city’s Tourism Advisory Board.

Sundays On Cole made its 2019 debut July 7 and will continue from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. every Sunday through the end of August.

The Chamber’s event planner, Kerry Salmonsen, said everything came together perfectly for Sunday’s season debut. The crowds were good and the vendors were pleased, she said; and the rain even stayed away.

With more vendors headed downtown for Week 2, she’s hoping for another prosperous Sunday.

Chamber CEO Troy Couch had recently addressed the Enumclaw City Council, offering a positive, pre-event report. He said about 40 vendors had signed up to participate (though not all will be on hand every week) prompting the closure of a third block of Cole Street.

Last year, the event filled one block on each side of Griffin Avenue, which remains open to traffic. This time around, Cole Street is closed for three blocks, from Myrtle Avenue on the north to Stevenson Avenue on the south.

The street will be filled with an array of vendors offering everything from skin care items to knife sharpening, from pork products to artwork.

Salmonsen said the Chamber listened carefully to comments made by last year’s attendees. The goal, she said, was to find vendors meeting customers’ desires. As a result, for example, there are fresh flowers this year from a local farm.

Adding to the shopping experience, many downtown businesses are keeping their doors open.

A new feature, limited to the 21-and-older set, is a beer garden. Setting up near the stage will be Cole Street Brewery.

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