The Enumclaw-Plateau Historical Society is the custodian of an older time capsule, which will be opened in 2027. The Historical Society is now helping the City of Enumclaw put together their own time capsule. Photo by Ray Miller-Still

The Enumclaw-Plateau Historical Society is the custodian of an older time capsule, which will be opened in 2027. The Historical Society is now helping the City of Enumclaw put together their own time capsule. Photo by Ray Miller-Still

Time capsule contents sought; will be opened in 2063

Enumclaw wants to remember: what was it like to live in 2018?

How will Enumclaw be remembered more than four decades down the road? And what will locals be thinking on Jan. 27, 2063, when they open a time capsule commemorating the city’s 150th anniversary?

Those questions are now circling City Hall as plans fall into place that will result in a time capsule containing items significant to today’s Enumclaw residents.

The project was made public by Mayor Jan Molinaro during the Aug. 27 meeting of the City Council.

Through Nov. 30, the mayor said, the public is encouraged to submit items to be considered for the time capsule. The theme is rather straightforward: What is it like to live in Enumclaw in 2018? Individuals, families and organizations are free to offer submissions, remembering that large items won’t fit. Capsule contents will be determined in December and it will be dedicated Jan. 27, 2019.

Items can be delivered to the administration office at Enumclaw City Hall, 1339 Griffin Ave. Each must include the name, address and phone number of the person or group making the submittal.

Items can also be dropped off at the Enumclaw Historical Museum on Thursdays and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m.

Anyone wishing more information can call 360-615-5606 or email Molinaro at jmolinaro@ci.enumclaw.wa.us.

In other items on their Aug. 27 agenda, members of the City Council:

• Were told Enumclaw has again earned the WellCity Award, presented by the Association of Washington Cities. The designation is important, the council was informed, for reasons that include dollars and cents. Receiving the award means the city qualifies for a 2 percent discount on premiums paid for employees covered by city insurance. That will result in savings of almost $22,000 this year. The wellness effort is spearheaded by a committee made of city employees. On hand to accept certificates of appreciation were Travis Rose, Jodine Burke, Darci Hanson, Michelle Larson and Maureen Burwell. Not in attendance were Vickie Forler and Cathy Burbank.

• Waived the bidding requirement that would normally accompany a public works project, opting instead to save approximately $175,000. Jeff Lincoln, the city’s public works director, explained that developers of the Pinnacle Peak development along Roosevelt Avenue will be digging a trench to install a sewer main. The city will install updated gas lines at the same time, in the same trench, Lincoln said.

The result, he noted, will be a financial savings, while improving the city’s natural gas supply system. Also, the road will not have to be torn up a second time for the gas line work, Lincoln added.

The state allows city’s to bypass a competitive bidding process when favorable conditions exist.

• Listened as Molinaro issued a proclamation declaring September as “National Recovery Month” in Enumclaw. On hand to voice her appreciation was Kathleen Murphy of the King County Behavioral Health and Recovery Division. That agency works to ensure that people with severe mental illness and substance use issues have access to care.

• Heard from six members of the local congregation of First Baptist Church. The church, which sits along state Route 169 on the city’s north side, is hoping to install an electronic sign at the front of its property, but is currently prohibited from doing so. The congregation is being proactive, hoping things will change in their favor as the city reviews its sign code. During the council’s previous meeting on Aug. 13, four people commented on behalf of the church.

• Voted to cancel their regularly-scheduled meeting of Sept. 10.

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