Opinion

OUR CORNER: No love for Iran on Valentine’s Day

Where is the love?

Iran has banned Valentine’s Day.

At least that’s what I’ve picked up from television news sources and the Internet.

It’s like the Dr. Suess’ Grinch trying to steal Christmas. There’ll be no pink cards, no fancy-wrapped chocolates, no tiny candy hearts, no candlelight dinners, fluffy stuffed animals or long-stemmed, red roses.

Shunned because, those news sources report, it spreads Western culture.

Yikes!

“What the world needs now is love, sweet love/

It’s the only thing that there’s just too little of...”.

Actually, notes one source, Valentine’s Day is not forbidden; it’s public displays of affection – remember, those are also not acceptable in high school hallways – and exchanging gifts that are frowned upon. And there’s one group that suggested replacing Valentine’s Day with an ancient Iranian festival dedicated to celebrating friendship, affection and love.

Whew.

It’s not like I’m a big Valentine’s Day participant, but I like what it represents.

I look at Valentine’s Day as a reminder for us in this hustle-bustle world to take the time to tell the folks close to us we love and care for them.

Do I have to purchase chocolates or cards to help me?

No.

I should be able to whisper it in my husband’s ear in the morning, or shout it at my kids as they’re piling out of the car for school.

I should be able to pick up the phone and let my mother and sister know; text a note to my brother and friends, or e-mail my mother- and father-in-law.

I should be able to tell a co-worker how nice it is to work with them.

Do I have to receive chocolates or cards to know I’m loved?

Probably not.

Banning Valentine’s Day here would seem a bit, well, un-American.

Besides, “Roses are red. Money is green. Spending is good, times are lean.”

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