Annual roadside herbicide applications start March 30 | Pierce County

Pierce County roadsides will get their annual makeover this spring and summer. An initial application of herbicides to combat weeds along road shoulders will start March 30, and continue through June. Targeted noxious weeds and brush control applications will occur through the end of November as needed. Only federal- and state-approved herbicides are used.

Pierce County roadsides will get their annual makeover this spring and summer.

An initial application of herbicides to combat weeds along road shoulders will start March 30, and continue through June. Targeted noxious weeds and brush control applications will occur through the end of November as needed. Only federal- and state-approved herbicides are used.

Workers will also mow, cut brush and trim trees along roads during the spring and summer. The work, which will be carried out weather permitting, is part of Pierce County’s integrated roadside vegetation management program.

“Properly maintained roadsides are important for the safety of motorists and pedestrians,” said Bruce Wagner, Pierce County Public Works road operations manager.

The annual maintenance also reduces fire danger, optimizes storm water drainage, helps control noxious weeds and non-native plants, and promotes native plant growth.

Renew “Owner Will Maintain” agreements

Property owners who do not want roadsides adjacent to their properties sprayed can sign an “Owner Will Maintain” agreement with Pierce County. Under this agreement, the property owner agrees to maintain the vegetation. If the property owner fails to perform as required, the maintenance of the right-of-way reverts to the county.

The agreement must be renewed each March. The owner must display a sign indicating their participation in the program prior to the application of herbicides.

Agreement applications and signs are available at the Central Maintenance Facility, 4812 196th St. E. in Spanaway, and by appointment at the West County Maintenance Facility, 13209 Goodnough Drive in Gig Harbor. Please call (253) 798-6000 for an appointment.

More information can be found at www.piercecountywa.org/ownermaintain or by calling (253) 798-6000.

 

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