Cities get through emotional turmoil | Our Corner

The next few weeks will bring the opening innings of a bucket full of local political races. Enumclaw, Bonney Lake, Buckley and Sumner have four city council seats up for grabs. Wilkeson has two. Black Diamond has nearly the whole clubhouse on the ballot due to a mix of expiring terms and resignations. The filing period is May 11-15.

The next few weeks will bring the opening innings of a bucket full of local political races. Enumclaw, Bonney Lake, Buckley and Sumner have four city council seats up for grabs. Wilkeson has two.

Black Diamond has nearly the whole clubhouse on the ballot due to a mix of expiring terms and resignations.

The filing period is May 11-15.

Like whiney teenagers, cities go through periods of turmoil, angst and severe throwing of arms in the air. Bonney Lake had its dance in the firelight of the full moon a few years back and came through it. If you feel your hamlet is a burning burger on an overheated grill, not to worry. Be assured the sky is really falling but, like water, a community will eventually find its level – it is all Politics 101.

After covering political races for what feels like an eternity, I have settled on one fact. I know less and less each year.

I am sure most who sign on the campaign line believe it is an act of service to the community, but as a responsible voter, we must be aware of the Gordian knot of motivations pushing and pulling any candidate.

Beware of the Ides of November and candidates who duck, dodge and refuse to answer questions because the newspaper guy is Mr. Ruin Your Life. Here is that logic taken to the edge of the rancid wading pool: It’s a negative story because the media covered it, which means an ax murder story would be positive if the dopey media guys just didn’t report it. (I suddenly have as stomach ache.)

There are few moments in life as heartwarming as an elected blaming the questionable answer given (sometimes known as an outright alternative reality) on the crummy question from the dippy editor. That darn truth thing. (I will stipulate the editor’s brain is fuzzy blue cheese dip… I can’t stand me either.)

For the political system to work, each part of the equation must add up… at least a little.

On the campaign side, candidates might as well embrace being a politician. I have always felt the whimpering about political skills and ambitions is snobby nonsense. We all use political tools at times or end up in the “I got fired line and I don’t know why.”

Politicians are in for far more criticism than most new candidates imagine. A candidate is always loved, until the hand is raised. Then it is time to deliver, or you have a brand new enemy that probably knows your weird middle name (thanks Mom).

On the voters’ side of the equation, our job is to be brainy box checkers. I suspect the many problem with the wrong wacko getting in office rest squarely in the hands of those filling out ballots… us.

As voters we need to be diligent detectives – talk and promises are easy, government action is hard. There is a reason for that. Goofy ideas are plentiful; I have at least one each hour (ask Becky and Sarah but please don’t believe them… only believe me).

Maybe if both parts of the equation put in the effort, the sum will be a positive number. If things don’t work out your way, give it time.  One can never tell what’s around the next election corner.

The good news is our Constitution was carefully crafted by very learned guys to withstand the worst, and it has.

 

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