Editorial | Saying goodbye is a drive on a long, lonely road | Dennis Box

I took a Friday off a couple of weeks ago and drove to Spokane. I am not supposed to tell you why I was there, based on orders from my daughter, Katy, who has decided running my life with a remote control from Spokane is a good idea. So I will just say I attended a graduation at Gonzaga.

I took a Friday off a couple of weeks ago and drove to Spokane.

I am not supposed to tell you why I was there, based on orders from my daughter, Katy, who has decided running my life with a remote control from Spokane is a good idea.

So I will just say I attended a graduation at Gonzaga.

This one was a little different because state Supreme Court Justice Debra Stephens was the keynote speaker. She had graduated from Gonzaga Law School.

I thought it was fun to see law students acting pretty much like a bunch of happy high school kids. The hope and enthusiasm in that room was infectious – even for me.

I understand some may think I am a little grouchy, but let it be known I am often known as Mr. Happy… somewhere.

It was very easy to see hope for the future of this country in that room.

The keynote speech by Stephens was the best I have ever heard. She talked about how the practice of law was changing in this country. She also addressed how this country in the near future will be in need of good legal minds more than ever.

I think she is correct.

After the graduation I took Katy and some of her friends out to eat, then I got out of the way so she could have fun without Mr. Happy around.

Driving home I had some time to talk to myself like a crazy person without anyone catching on. I figure I’m in a car and if someone sees me they will either think I am singing, talking on my bluetooth or I have an imaginary friend.

I remembered the seven years earlier when my wife, Ginny, and I took Katy to Eastern Washington University to start school.

It was about 10 at night and we got her settled in the dorm room and took her out to eat dinner somewhere in Spokane.

On the ride home Katy burst into tears and told us to take her home. She didn’t want to go to “stupid college.”

It may be the one of the hardest thing I have ever done, leaving her at the dorm.

As we left Cheney for home I kept telling Ginny I was fine to drive.

“I got it all under control… no sweat.”

After about five minutes or so Ginny asked me what all the lights were ahead.

“Spokane… I guess I’m going the wrong way.”

Oh well. I didn’t get lost going home this time, but seemed like a very long drive.

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