Olympia has case of Boeing Fatigue | Jerry Cornfield

More than the usual exchange of cold and flu germs occurred among lawmakers this session.

More than the usual exchange of cold and flu germs occurred among lawmakers this session.

An outbreak of a rare virus indiscriminately infected Democrats and Republicans in the House and Senate on Day One and showed no sign of abating before they adjourn this week.

It is a strain of Boeing Fatigue Syndrome, a political disorder characterized by extreme exhaustion from repeated legislative genuflecting at the altar of the aerospace giant.

Historically it’s manifested itself among a handful of members of the Legislature unafraid of vocally criticizing a corporation which is vital to keeping Washington’s economy alive and healthy.

This illness spread in recent months and symptoms are present in nearly every one of the 147 lawmakers.

Many started experiencing fatigue soon after casting a vote in a November special session to extend tax breaks which could save the company an estimated $8.7 billion on future sales of the new 777X jetliner.

When they arrived in Olympia in January, they believed their action inoculated them from further requests from the aerospace firm in 2014.

So just the mention of Boeing caused lawmakers’ eyes to bulge, faces to redden and blurts of “Haven’t we done enough for them already?”

This explains why lawmakers roundly ignored Gov. Jay Inslee’s request for funds for two aerospace-related initiatives aimed in the direction of The Boeing Co.

Writers of the House and Senate budgets did not include $500,000 for Washington State University to establish a School of Advanced Manufacturing and Aerospace in Everett.

Nor did they put in $500,000 for the University of Washington to develop an advanced manufacturing facility in Snohomish County.

And remember how the governor and some Democrats regularly touted the importance of a multi-billion dollar transportation funding package to Boeing and the aerospace industry? Not only did they stop using that line, there’s almost no chance there will even be a package agreed upon this session.

To their credit, Boeing lobbyists recognized the mood of lawmakers early in the session and are making themselves pretty scarce.

There’s good news for the firm, as most legislators will make a full recovery March 14.

That’s the first day they can raise money for their re-election campaigns. There may be no better cure for this syndrome than a contribution from Boeing.

Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www.heraldnet.com.

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