OUR CORNER: Tips to succeed in your resolution

With each new year, there are New Year’s resolutions.

With each new year, there are New Year’s resolutions.

New Year’s Eve is a time for looking back to the past and looking forward to the coming year. It’s a time to reflect on the changes we want or need to make for a better new year.

The hardest part of making New Year’s resolutions is keeping them.

According to www.goalsguy.com, the tradition of the New Year’s resolutions goes all the way back to 153 B.C. Janus, a mythical king of early Rome was placed at the head of the calendar. With two faces, Janus could look back on past events and forward to the future. He became the ancient symbol for resolutions to the Romans.

Recent research shows that while 52 percent of participants in a resolution study were confident of success with their goals, only 12 percent actually achieved their goals. Men achieved their desires 22 percent more often when they engaged in formal goal setting, while women succeeded 10 percent more when they made their goals public and got support from their friends.

Popular resolutions include improving such things as health, family life, finances, career, eduction, self image and volunteering, among others.

Here are a few tips that can help keep most of your New Year’s resolutions:

• Improving health: exercise and eating better are key. Walking is a great way to lose weight and exercise at the same time. Doctors say walking 30 minutes a day is great for individuals. If it rains, hit the mall walking. Staying away from fried and greasy foods will also help. Reducing consumption of soft drinks and alcohol can help, along with quitting smoking. Get with family or friends and join a fitness club. Walking or working out with a partner or group is better than doing it alone.

• Improving finances usually means getting out of debt or saving money. One way to save money is to look for the best bargins when shopping for food or clothing – just keep an eye on the sales. “Buy one, get one free” deals are great. Today, many people are shopping at local discount stores for food, while some thrift stores can be a great place for clothing for the family. Teens love faded and worn out jeans. Why buy new, when you can by used at a much less price? Debt consolidation may be another answer to fixing you debt problems.

• Improving your career is getting a promotion or getting a better-paying job. Everyone’s goal – in today’s economic times – is to make more money working or, for some, to find employment. Improving you skills by taking college courses or training can help you get a step up on fellow employees. For some of those seeking employment, a temporary employment agency can be a good place to start.

Also, look at revising your resume to highlight your experience and skills. Apply for jobs you are qualified for.

Sometimes sending out resumes can be like batting in baseball – the more you swing, the more chances you’ll get a hit.

• Improving education can consist of attending college or learning something new like a trade. Online course makes it easier to further your education or obtain a college degree. Community and technical colleges offer many courses which can help with finding employment or working your way up the corporate ladder.

• Improving yourself to become more organized and manage time better. Get a “day-timer” notebook to help keep track of meetings and appointments. Time management and organization can reduce stress and can allow you to spend more time enjoying hobbies or making time for the family. Remember, all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.

• Volunteering to help others this year. If you have never volunteers at a senior center, food bank or school, make 2010 the year to break the habit. Volunteering and helping others can be fun and rewarding. And it also a great place to meet people and connect with the community.

You may not be able to change everything, but if you change one thing in your life in 2010 it’s worth it.

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