Remove studded tires by March 31 | Department of Transportation

As spring approaches across the region, the Washington State Department of Transportation reminds drivers to remove their studded tires by midnight Tuesday, March 31.

  • Friday, March 20, 2015 6:16pm
  • Opinion

As spring approaches across the region, the Washington State Department of Transportation reminds drivers to remove their studded tires by midnight Tuesday, March 31.

Under state law, driving with studded tires after March 31, is a traffic infraction and could result in a $124 ticket.

In addition, studs can wear down pavement, so removing them promptly helps extend the lifetime of state roadways. Tire removal services can get crowded as the deadline approaches, so please plan accordingly.

Washington State Department of Transportation crews will continue to monitor roads, passes and forecasts and work to clear any late season snow or ice. Travelers are always reminded to know before you go by checking road conditions before heading out and staying on top of conditions with WSDOT’s social media and email alert tools.

Washington and Oregon share the same studded tire removal date. Other states may have later deadlines, but the Washington law applies to all drivers in the state, even visitors. No personal waivers are issued.

More information about studded tire regulations in Washington is available online.

 

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