Too tough to tell what future holds | Our Corner

Once again The Courier-Herald is off the press and the sky still appears to be propped up and in place, although I haven’t checked in the last 15 minutes. One moment, please…. OK, the sky is still up and I am still down – I will keep writing. I have been thinking a great deal recently about the multiple roles a newspaper plays in a community (My single-cell of gray goo needed a few extra injections of out-of-date buttermilk to keep up with this thinking stuff).

Once again The Courier-Herald is off the press and the sky still appears to be propped up and in place, although I haven’t checked in the last 15 minutes. One moment, please….

OK, the sky is still up and I am still down – I will keep writing.

I have been thinking a great deal recently about the multiple roles a newspaper plays in a community (My single-cell of gray goo needed a few extra injections of out-of-date buttermilk to keep up with this thinking stuff).

All newspapers work and write in a community. The community may be a small town, a region, a county or a country. The process is similar in all, but the palette is different.

A newspaper is a different kind of chicken. It is a business with First Amendment protection. Although like any constitutional right, it comes with limitations and, most importantly, responsibilities.

Most businesses are concerned with keeping the doors on the hinges and selling widgets smothered in cheese.

The intriguing part of a newspaper is the number of balls that must be kept in the air simultaneously to keep the presses running.

I have read a pile of articles from around the country about the future of newspapers. Most are either misinformed or in service of great and glorious Wizard of I Am.

I learned long ago to never predict the future. I can barely predict where I will be in the next seven minutes, or remember where I am supposed to be in the next seven minutes.

The writing goddesses Sarah and Becky are constantly telling me where I should be and pointing out I am not there… wherever there is. Nothing like youth and a functional brain complete with memory. I must have had that once.

Most of the articles I come across concerning newspapers are authored by someone who is not producing a paper.

Here is a secret: No one has a clue what’s ahead – including those attractive guys with beer cans strapped to their heads calling for the apocalypse.  I have been looking over The Courier-Herald editions from the early 1900s. One thing stood out to me. Papers change and adapt to time and place.

In the 1920s, The Courier-Herald printed everything from local to national and international news. Beside a story about the president might be a piece about the spirited rummy game at Mrs. Morticia Whedudle’s house. I will not be covering rummy games anytime soon.

I am working on a bringing in a mystery columnist raised on the Plateau who is conversant with moo cows and milking. (There is a scurrilous rumor started by an anonymous source named S.G. with apparent hair that she is a secret vegan. I will be investigating this in a future column.)

In my estimation the essential ingredient for a newspaper is finding the right slurry of news, community, sports and fun. I believe writers who are interested in the subject will produce better stories – stories readers want to read.

Of course, newspapers have two avenues today – the print publication and the web.

That is broad and colorful palette.

Editor’s Note:

Seattle Opera’s presentation of Handel’s “Semele” is excellent. It is an opera the young will enjoy. It is not just for boring buttermilk-drinkers like me.

 

More in Opinion

Poking dead things with sticks

They don’t mince words when they call it a “crawl space,” do they?

America is denying three hard truths

There are three major hard truths that our current government has been denying with great vigor: The Mueller Russia-U.S. Presidential election connection investigation, the war in Afghanistan, and the growing national deficit.

Promote the common good by ensuring individual liberty

Citizens following their passions and dreams improve the lot for all.

The three personas of President Trump

There’s Teleprompter Trump, Raw Meat Trump and Twitter Trump.

Carbon pricing won’t help environment, but will hurt taxpayers

How would a Washington carbon tax make a difference in the world “climate?”

It’s never enough

Based on numbers from the legislature, Enumclaw School District will be receiving huge funding increases from the state. Yet here we are with Enumclaw and a bunch of other districts telling the taxpayers, give us more, we need more.

Why are trailers allowed at Expo Center?

When my husband and I moved to our home in 2001 and for every year after the Expo Center grounds have always been pleasant to look at on your way to our home. No longer is this true.

A small act of kindness can make a big impact | SoHaPP

Join SoHaPP’s book group this February to discuss “Wonder” by R.J. Palacio. Don’t have the book? Check it out at the Enumclaw Library or visit The Sequel.

Vote ‘yes’ on replacement Education Programs levy

As a high school senior that has spent the entirety of my school life in Enumclaw, I know we have to take it upon ourselves to ensure the efficiency and inclusiveness of our school system.

Concern for common good is buried by greed

Tell big lies long and loudly enough and people will believe you.

Enumclaw boys, join the scouts

Troop 422 here in Enumclaw has taught me these things, and it has allowed me to be able to incorporate these things into my own life.

Concessions may be needed to enact carbon pricing

This is the sixth year Gov. Jay Inslee will try to convince lawmakers that the best means of fighting climate change is by making it more expensive to pollute.