Be smart during seasonal hiring season | Better Business Bureau

The holidays are just around the corner and businesses are already busy hiring for seasonal work. According to the National Retail Federation holiday sales increased three percent last year to $626.1 billion.

The holidays are just around the corner and businesses are already busy hiring for seasonal work. According to the National Retail Federation holiday sales increased three percent last year to $626.1 billion.

If you’re looking to cash in on the hiring surge keep the following in mind:

Overpayment for work. Watch out if your new employer wants you to deposit your paycheck and then transfer the leftover money. Your paycheck is likely fraudulent and will bounce, leaving you to cover the overdrawn funds.

Vague company descriptions. It’s a huge red flag if you can’t identify the company’s owner, headquarters or even product. Just because they listed an ad online doesn’t mean the business is legitimate. Pro tip: check with BBB to see if the employer has a good rating.

Check company websites. Last year BBB received reports of several “Target” and “Macy’s” seasonal hiring solicitations that led to phishing schemes. Be sure to check the company’s official website to verify if the job is official.

No interview. If you are offered a job without a formal interview or job application, it’s most likely a scam. Be wary of jobs that hire you on the spot or conduct interviews via online chat or instant messaging services.

In 2015 the NRF estimated retailers would hire between 700,000 and 750,000 new holiday positions. And some of those seasonal jobs turn into permanent positions.

Follow these tips for landing that holiday job:

Start early. If you hold off on job hunting until November, you’re already too late. Most employers are already conducting seasonal hiring interviews so it’s best to put in your application now.

Look at multiple industries. Retail typically does most of the holiday hiring, but shipping companies, restaurants and event facilities are also looking for extra help. Don’t limit yourself to just one industry during the holiday season.

Be flexible. If possible, be willing to work unpopular hours. Putting your time in now can eventually lead to full-time work with hours you prefer.

For more business tips and tricks visit Better Business Bureau serving the Northwest’s blog at bbbnorthwest.org.

More in Business

Oil giants betting on electric tech | Don Brunell

Making electric cars and new batteries for homes and power grids is a major step toward replacing carbon-based energy with electricity from renewables such as wind and solar.

California wildfires spark renewed debate over underground power lines | Don Brunell

Power lines could have caused the Camp wildfire in California.

Microsoft has expanded their AccountGuard service to 12 new European Countries. Yellow: European countries already protected. Blue: European countries now protected. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Microsoft warns of hacking ahead of elections

Launching defense services in Europe.

Those pesky tax incentives | Don Brunell

We need them to start big projects, no matter how much of a pain they may be in the future.

Praerit Garg joins Smartsheet as CTO

Bellevue-based company employs 760 people

In Buckley, more storage units on 410, beer and wine downtown

Wood, Wine, & Whimsy got their alcohol license Feb. 12.

Growing resistance to corporate incentives | Don Brunell

There is a growing backlash to corporations among liberals.

America is heading down the wrong track | Don Brunell

The push to replace entrepreneurs with bureaucrats is puzzling.

OfferUp founder Nick Huzar makes customer safety a core pillar

Bellevue-based CEO wanted a simpler solution to his own problems

Photo by Tiffany Von Arnim/Flickr
Puget Sound companies join to create middle-income housing

Several are the same companies that opposed Seattleā€™s head tax last year.

Student debt draining retired parent income | Don Brunell

Parents are coming out of retirement to help their kids pay for their education.

Washington farmers need tariff relief | Don Brunell

They lost $106 million last year due to the trade war with China.