Comcast to continue 60 days of free internet service to new, eligible customers

Low-income monthly options also available

Courtesy Photo, Comcast

Courtesy Photo, Comcast

Comcast announced Thursday that it will continue to provide 60 days of free internet service to new, eligible Internet Essentials customers.

In March, Comcast announced that eligible new customers would receive 60 days of Internet Essentials service without charge as a way to help deal with the challenges of the COVID-19 outbreak. As the current school year comes to an end, school districts across the country are already announcing plans for when school returns in the fall.

Originally set to expire on June 30, the free offer will now be available through the end of this year, according to a Comcast news release. In addition, Comcast will continue to waive, through the end of the year, the requirement that customers not have a past due balance with Comcast to qualify for the free offer.

To-date, this program has connected more than 340,000 Washington residents to low-income internet options, including more than 132,000 across all of King County, 20,800 in Kent, 13,600 in Federal Way, 10,800 in Auburn and 8,400 in Renton.

“For almost a decade, Comcast has been helping to level the playing field for families in need so they can benefit from all the internet has to offer,” said Dana Strong, president of Xfinity Consumer Services. “So, we’re happy to be able to extend this 60 days of free internet service to new customers. Now more than ever, connectivity has become a vital tool for families to access educational resources for students, important news and information about their community and the world, telehealth applications, or to stay in touch with family and friends.”

Since 2011, Internet Essentials has connected more than two million low-income families to the internet, serving approximately eight million people. During that period, the program has grown from focusing on bridging the “homework gap” for school-age children to being deeply invested in providing digital equity. The program, which offers low-cost, high-speed Internet service for $9.95 a month plus tax, also provides multiple options to access free digital skills training in print, online, and in person. In addition, customers have the option to purchase a low-cost internet-ready computer.

Internet Essentials is structured in partnership between Comcast and tens of thousands of school districts, libraries, elected officials, and nonprofit community partners. For individuals and organizations interested in becoming a partner, please visit: https://partner.internetessentials.com to order free collateral materials that will also be shipped free of charge.

Applicants can go to: internetessentials.com using any web-connected device, including mobile phones. The accessible website also includes the option to video chat with customer service agents in American Sign Language. In addition, there are two dedicated phone numbers 1-855-846-8376 for English and 1-855-765-6995 for Spanish.


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