Healthy healthcare workers are key to fighting diseases | Don Brunell

Coronavirus may seem like big news, but the flu is still more deadly.

Keeping hospitals and health workers healthy is key to fighting diseases. With new and more deadly viruses, the job is more challenging.

Although the coronavirus has captured the world’s attention, it is important to note the Center for Disease Control estimates that 80,000 Americans died of flu and flu complications in the winter of 2017-2018 – the highest flu-related death toll in at least four decades.

The coronavirus outbreak is very serious. According to the New York Times, China’s Health Commission reported 361 deaths nationwide as of Feb.2. During the 2002-2003 SARS outbreak, 349 people died in mainland China.

The coronavirus is not just a China problem. It is showing up in other countries prompting the Chinese government to quarantine the world’s seventh largest city, Wuhan. Foreign airlines and passenger railroads have curtailed service to China which is the world’s largest manufacturing economy and exporter of goods.

There is growing concern about the safety of doctors, nurses and health care workers. That worry is not new, but in Hong Kong, for example, some nurses are now striking demanding better protection. One promising answer is microbial copper textiles.

In 2014, during the Ebola outbreak, British clinical Researcher Rory Donnelly told Khaleej Times copper-impregnated clothing is the most viable and immediate answer.

“With staff becoming exposed to the virus through lack of appropriate protective equipment, including masks, gowns, and gloves, copper clothing is another form of prevention. Several clinical and laboratory studies have been carried out showing copper ions destroy bacteria and the benefits to humans have recently come to light,” Donnelly said.

The coronavirus has sparked new interest in copper clothing——not copper coated armored suits—-but textiles impregnated with copper which kill bacteria and odor on contact and show promising results in rejecting viruses.

“The interest in antimicrobials, especially antiviral coating, is very, very high,” A Blanton Godfrey, dean of the North Carolina State University, College of Textiles in Raleigh, told the Associated Press in 2006. “Whoever gets it right will have a very nice business.”

An Israeli company, Cupron, started making copper-laced socks nearly 20 year ago and has expanded into the U.S. Its Richmond, VA, operation successfully tested it copper-infused linens and hard surfaces in Virginia and North Carolina hospitals in 2018. Since the company developed a process to incorporate anti-microbial copper formulations into soft materials such as towels, gowns and masks.

Last November, the American Society of Microbiology released a new study which discovered that copper hospital beds in intensive care units had 95 percent fewer bacteria than conventional beds.

That’s important because “hospital-acquired infections sicken approximately 2 million Americans annually, and kill nearly 100,000,” Dr. Michael G. Schmidt, University of South Carolina, Charleston, said. They are the eighth leading cause of U.S. deaths.

Copper and its alloys are important tools in fighting diseases and infections. While government officials are correct to worry about ingestion of any heavy metal into the human body, testing shows that microbial copper are safe and when used in health care have significant impact on preventing doctors and health care workers from contracting illnesses.

Copper is the only metal which is deadly to viruses, bacterial and fungal infections. The International Journal of Infection Control reports copper is effective in fighting disease which develop drug resistant mutations.

Medical experts correctly fear a repeat of the last influenza pandemic that swept our planet in 1918. The Spanish flu killed an estimated 50 million people—three percent of the world’s population. One fifth of the world’s population was attacked by the deadly virus

The bottom line is healthy health workers are key to helping us recover from common illnesses and epidemics. Copper will likely help improve their safety.

Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.


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