Lemon law will protect Chrysler owners

Here’s some sweet news for Chrysler owners: the Chrysler Group and Fiat have agreed to honor the “Lemon Law” rights of buyers when the new company takes control of the U.S. auto maker, Attorney General Rob McKenna announced June 3.

Here’s some sweet news for Chrysler owners: the Chrysler Group and Fiat have agreed to honor the “Lemon Law” rights of buyers when the new company takes control of the U.S. auto maker, Attorney General Rob McKenna announced June 3.

“The Lemon Law provides important protections for consumers whose new vehicles have recurring problems,” he said. “Under this agreement, the new Chrysler Group will honor those rights for vehicles sold or leased prior to the closure of the ‘old’ Chrysler.

“Not only does this agreement help consumers, but increased consumer confidence means more sales, benefiting the company and its workers,” he said.

A group of attorneys general and counsel for the National Association of Attorneys General negotiated the agreement, which is contained in the Bankruptcy Court judge’s order issued June 1. The Washington Attorney General’s Office assisted in drafting the terms.

McKenna said the states are watching the General Motors bankruptcy carefully for similar issues.

Washington’s Lemon Law allows vehicle owners to request an arbitration hearing through the Attorney General’s Office. To qualify, a car must be new or have fewer than 24,000 miles when it was purchased or leased.

Consumers who were sold a “lemon” have the option to have the vehicle replaced or bought back by the manufacturer if one of the following conditions applies:

• The vehicle has been in the shop four or more times for the same problem which still exists;

• The vehicle has been in the shop at least twice because of a defect likely to cause death or substantial bodily injury and the problem still exists;

• The vehicle has been out of service for any number of problems at least 30 days. The days out of service do not need to be consecutive;

• Beginning July 26, a vehicle will also qualify if two or more different “serious safety defects” occur within a year and attempts to diagnose or repair the problems were unsuccessful.

More information about the Lemon Law is available online at www.atg.wa.gov/lemonlaw.aspx.


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@courierherald.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.courierherald.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 500 words or less.

More in Business

At Fitness For Life, it’s all about empowering women

Nikki Staab opened her second location in Enumclaw last June.

How businesses and drones help restore scorched forestlands | Don Brunell

Drones can help plant trees 150 times faster than an experienced (human) tree planter.

Facebook purchases unused Bellevue REI headquarters

The companies will also each donate $1 million to the Eastrail

Colder weather could chill restaurant recovery | Don Brunell

Summer helped restaurants — will winter kill them?

Free face masks available at King County Safeway locations

Stores to distribute 750,000 purchased by King County starting Aug. 24

New nuclear power needs solution inclusion | Don Brunell

Even Washingtonians need nuclear power, and the state gets 70 percent of their electricity from hydropower.

The Green New Deal is incomplete | Don Brunell

Democrats need to focus on more than just CO2.

File Photo
LA Fitness to reopen all locations Aug. 10

Gyms will follow state guidelines

Council ponders allowing alcohol in downtown area

To keep the downtown economy rolling, Enumclaw is considering what other cities have already enacted.

Stock photo
New program to help ensure safe start compliance in restaurants, taverns

Launched by Public Health – Seattle & King County

Financial freedom in a post-COVID World | Few Minute Finance

Columnist Luke Miller, a pilot passionate about personal finance, introduces himself to Courier-Herald readers.

Local businesses discuss strategies to stay open

Sundays on Cole and monthly cruises are a lifeline to restaurants and retailers — but how long will it last?