Expansion work and the games pause at the Muckleshoot Casino, per the governor’s order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. RACHEL CIAMPI, Auburn Reporter

Expansion work and the games pause at the Muckleshoot Casino, per the governor’s order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. RACHEL CIAMPI, Auburn Reporter

Muckleshoot Casino in Auburn extends closure through at least April 14

Tribe had hoped for March 31 reopening

The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe in Auburn has decided to extend the closure of its casino and bingo operations through at least April 14 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

General Manager Conrad Granito posted an update Wednesday to the casino’s Facebook page.

“Almost 25 years ago, the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe created what is now a vital economic engine with a dream, a tent and you,” Granito said. “It is with the continued well-being of a people and community in mind that we are extending our temporary closure through at least April 14.

“This extension supports Gov. Jay Inslee’s recent “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order. It also underscores the commitment of Tribal and Casino leadership to prioritizing the safety of our guests, our team and the larger community we serve. We will continue to closely evaluate federal, state and local recommendations regarding COVID-19 and make adjustments as needed.

“During this challenging time when so much is uncertain, we will continue to ensure base wages and enrolled benefits for all Muckleshoot Casino team members.

Continue to follow us on social media and visit us at MuckleshootCasino.com for reopening updates as well as preliminary answers to questions about Free Play, expiring points, and more.

Please continue to stay safe and we look forward to seeing you again soon.”

The Tribal Council closed the casino on March 17 and initially planned to be closed for two weeks through March 31 after Inslee announced an emergency proclamation that mandated the immediate two-week closure of all restaurants, bars and entertainment and recreational facilities, as well as additional limits on large gatherings.


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