Summer festival season ready to take off

It’s getting to be that time of year when we powder our faces with sunshine and celebrate the community we live, work and play in. The Enumclaw community and chamber’s summer agenda is chock-full of programs and events for all to enjoy. Mark your calendars for these upcoming events:

It’s getting to be that time of year when we powder our faces with sunshine and celebrate the community we live, work and play in. The Enumclaw community and chamber’s summer agenda is chock-full of programs and events for all to enjoy. Mark your calendars for these upcoming events:

July 4 – Stars and Stripes celebration. The Fourth of July parade this year will begin at high noon to kick off the events downtown. Once again, a fireworks display will take place at the Expo Center at dusk.

July 16-18 – Enumclaw’s King County Fair and Chamber Business Expo. Can’t you just smell the corn dogs and strawberry shortcake? Stop by the Chamber Business Expo booth for promotions from local businesses.

July 24-25 – Enumclaw’s Street Fair. This popular Street Fair has a small circus coming to town, lots of delicious food vendors, and a dunk tank with the Enumclaw Fire Department.

July 24-26 – Scottish Highland Games. If you have never experienced the massing of the pipes and drums, you haven’t experienced all that life has to offer.

Aug. 5 – Chamber Golf Classic. We fill up the field every year with fun golfers, so get your teams signed up today.

Sept. 12 – Cruise into Fall antique car show. This eighth annual car show hosted by the Stratocruisers will take over downtown streets and parking lots with wheels from days gone by.

These and many more events will take place throughout Enumclaw and at the Expo Center. For more information on any of these programs or events and more, visit our Web site at www.enumclawchamber.com/calendar.

All community events are welcome to be posted on our Web site.

Have a safe and wonderful summer.

Cathy Rigg is executive director of the Enumclaw Area Chamber or Commerce.


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