Westfield Southcenter Mall to reopen June 15

Westfield Southcenter Mall to reopen June 15

Modified hours; safety protocols

Westfield Southcenter announced Friday that it will reopen starting on Monday, June 15.

The Tukwila mall closed in March because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The modified hours will be 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and noon to 6 p.m. on Sunday, according to a Westfield press release. Westfield will implement relevant government-mandated health and safety protocols as well as provide new services and amenities to address customer concerns during this initial recovery phase in the community.

“Westfield is excited to open our doors again to the Seattle community as we begin our initial recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Westfield Southcenter general manager Jason Dyer in the press release. “We are working closely with local officials and other relevant community groups to ensure a healthy, clean and safe environment for our customers, tenants and employees; and are committed to providing the best experience possible as business begins to operate at the center.”

Westfield Southcenter will implement new practices focused on the health, safety, and convenience of all guests, as well as retailer and center employees. They include:

– Increasing the frequency of cleaning measures following CDC and local health department guidelines, with a focus on high-touch areas such as restrooms, play areas, dining areas, and water fountains

– Monitoring and controlling the number of guests entering the centers and crowds in dwell areas and queuing lines

– Implementing and enforcing relevant policies related to social distancing, face masks and other preventative measures

– Providing an increased number of hand sanitizer stations.

The center will continue to work with select retailers to facilitate curbside pick-up to make it as easy as possible for customers to quickly and safely collect purchases. More details on these programs are available from individual retailers, or through the center’s website.

In addition, as its centers reopen Westfield is rolling out a suite of digital services to help address customer and community concerns as well as the needs of its retailers and restaurants, while continuing to deliver a best in class customer experience. These services include LINE PASS, a proprietary digital queue system that offers a safer shopping experience for both guests and retailers by allowing customers to join a retailer wait list or book an appointment in advance from their home, car, or while in the center. LINE PASS is available via the Westfield app, which can be downloaded from the App Store or Google Play.

Westfield is also increasing the availability of customer service representatives and ambassadors at its properties and will continue to offer its Answers on the Spot program, which provides a real-time response by texting 360-390-4911 or webchat during hours of center operation to answer questions about store and center hours, promotions, and other topics.

The company will continue its #WestfieldCares program by supporting No Kid Hungry through the sale of protective face masks and no touch keys at the center. For every no touch tool and mask bundle sold now through Aug. 31, Westfield will donate $1 to No Kid Hungry, which can provide up to 10 meals to children in need.

The masks and keys will be sold at Westfield centers across the U.S. now through the month of August, with the company donating up to $100,000. #WestfieldCares was launched earlier this year to help some of the most vulnerable populations impacted by the COVID-19 crisis, including the homeless, economically disadvantaged families, seniors, and children along with activities thanking local first responders and medical professionals.

Further information on the center including individual retailer and restaurant operating hours, health and safety practices, local #WestfieldCares initiatives and other programs can be found on the Westfield Southcenter website.


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