Will your vote help create private sector jobs? | Don Brunell’s Business View

Elections are always important, but the stakes are particularly high this year with our economy stuck in neutral and threatening to slip into reverse.

Elections are always important, but the stakes are particularly high this year with our economy stuck in neutral and threatening to slip into reverse.

The economy will move forward only when employers feel confident enough to begin hiring. The choices voters make this November will either strengthen or weaken employer confidence.

When you mark your ballot, ask yourself, “Will my vote help create real private-sector jobs for me and my family? Will my vote put us on the path to reducing our crushing federal debt? Will my vote begin to reverse years of high unemployment?”

This will be a pivotal election and both camps will have their get-out-the-vote efforts. But voting is something Americans often take for granted. That is in stark contrast to the people of Iraq who braved death threats in 2005 to vote in their first free election.

By comparison, Americans have it easy. Perhaps too easy. Having the right to vote isn’t enough — we have to use it! 

Washington citizens are more active than most when it comes to voting. But even here, the number of people voting in major elections has dwindled over time.

According to the Secretary of State’s office, back in 1952 nearly 91 percent of eligible adults in Washington were registered to vote, and 80 percent of them went to the polls.

In 2008, only 72 percent of eligible adults were registered. Even though a high percentage of them voted, the lower number of registered voters meant that only six out of ten eligible people voted.

What does that mean?

It means that four of every 10 adults let other people make decisions for them. They threw away the right to decide who leads their state and nation and what direction we take.

This is a big election year in Washington state. In addition to the governor’s race between Democrat Jay Inslee and Republican Rob McKenna, Secretary of State Sam Reed and Auditor Brian Sonntag are both retiring this year.

Initiative 1185 will let voters decide — again — if they want to require a two-thirds majority vote of the Legislature to increase taxes. Hopefully, the answer will be “yes” — again.

Initiative 1240 would allow charter public schools in Washington, one of only nine states without that option. Voters should say yes to this opportunity to provide parents with more choices for their children’s education.

But however you vote . . . vote!

In spite of everything, some folks believe they can’t make a difference. Not true.

Remember the 2004 Washington governor’s race? It was the closest political race in U.S. history. RepublicanDino Rossi was declared the winner in the initial automated count and again in the automated recount. It wasn’t until after the second recount done by hand that Democrat Christine Gregoire was declared the winner by 129 votes.

The only way to guarantee you don’t make a difference is to not vote. And, as the old timers say, if you don’t vote, you can’t complain.

Monday, Oct. 8 is the last day to update your registration or register online or through the mail, and Oct. 29 is the deadline to register in person.

General Election ballots will be mailed out to registered voters on Oct. 19. Your completed ballot must be postmarked no later than Election Day.  (Remember to sign it.)

If you’re dropping off your ballot in person, you must deposit it in a designated ballot drop box or at your county elections office by 8 p.m. on Election Day. Contact the Secretary of State’s office or your county elections office for assistance.

Voting is easier — and more important —than ever these days. Vote.


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@courierherald.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.courierherald.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 500 words or less.

More in Business

Don Brunell
E-waste reduction requires innovative approaches | Brunell

Less than 13 percent of electronics are recycled — the rest is dumped.

Don Brunell
Boeing’s good news | Brunell

Boeing’s revamped 737MAX to ready to return to service.

Venise Cunningham and Belinda Kelly celebrating the opening of their new restaurant and bar, the Simple Goodness Sisters Soda Shop in Wilkeson. Contributed photo
Simple Goodness Sisters Soda Shop opens in Wilkeson

There’s sodas for the kids, cocktails for the adults, and ice cream and sandwiches to round out the family-friendly vibe of the new shop.

Don Brunell
Coronavirus spurring air cargo growth | Brunell

Air cargo sector has retained 92 percent of its business during the pandemic.

Melisa Kahne makes all of her own products, which can be bought online or even at Nature's Inventory, another shop on Cole Street. Contributed photo
The business of beauty: how Kanary Naturals began

The story of how an entrepreneur had to completely change how she did business.

Don Brunell
Diversity in America’s military | Don Brunell

A history of integration on America’s military.

These are just a sample of Blaze Ward and Leah Cutter's many, many book series. The two Enumclaw authors also write non-fiction books about how to write and make it your business, and collaborate on a number of anthology magazines. Contributed images
Enumclaw authors explain how to write (and make money doing it)

Leah Cutter and Blaze Wars have always wanted to be writers and storytellers. And, thanks to independent publishing, are able to live off of their works.

Image courtesy Enumclaw Chamber of Commerce
Enumclaw Chamber launches new “Imbibe Tour”

The tour takes you across Enumclaw’s seven breweries and wineries.

Enumclaw businesses were able to apply for a $7,000 grant from the city of Enumclaw last September. It was recently discovered at least two businesses did apply, but their application was lost due to a technological error. Image courtesy the city of Enumclaw
More businesses get COVID funds

A tech error led to at least two local businesses’ grant application to the city of Enumclaw getting lost.

Don Brunell
Defunding the police is a bad idea | Brunell

Seattle now has one of the lowest ratios of cops to citizens of major U.S. cities.

Don Brunell
President uses rare order to break China’s hammerlock on critical metals | Brunell

The only American rare earth mine is located in California, but it has to be processed in Canada.

Mail Express was fined $7,500 by L&I. Photo by Ray Miller-Still
Local business fined by LI for failing to wear, enforce masks

The Mail Express Business Center was fined $7,500, the most of 11 businesses.